ASIA 373 History of Hong Kong

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This year’s course explores the history, culture, and identities of Hong Kong from the port’s pre-colonial settings in the early nineteenth century to its post-colonial contexts.


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Summer 2016
No ASIA course(s) were found for S2016 term.


One of the earliest maps of the Hong Kong region, learn how the this fantastic city has transformed. ©Henry Li, used under CC BY-SA 2.5

One of the earliest maps of the Hong Kong region, learn how this fantastic city has transformed in ASIA 373W. ASIA 373W will focus on the port’s pre-colonial settings in the early nineteenth century to its post-colonial contexts. ©Henry Li, used under CC BY-SA 2.5.

Its goals are to help students develop the language and tools to understand the metamorphoses of this most unusual metropolis as well as to further their skills in historical analysis. This course encourages students to critically consider Hong Kong’s multifaceted identities as well as to take into account the local, national, and transnational (not to mention international) contexts of its spectacular transformations.

This poster from 1958 promoted the use of CMA Hong Kong products. Over the following four decades, Hong Kong's economy would boom- seeing GDP increase 180 times - and would become known as one of the four Asian Tigers.

This poster from 1958 promoted the use of CMA Hong Kong products. Over the following four decades, Hong Kong would become known as one of the four Asian Tigers thanks to its booming economy – which saw GDP grow 180 times.

By the end of the term, students should be able to identify some of the major themes, events, and historiographical debates concerning the history of Hong Kong. They will gain a better understanding of the variety of sources available for the study of Hong Kong, and become more critical consumers and producers of historical knowledge.
During the Hong Kong Umbrella Revolution in 2014, several news outlets invited Dr. Leo Shin to provide commentary on the meaning and future implications of the protest. In Term 2, Dr. Shin will be teaching ASIA 310W, a course on the History of Hong Kong.

Who will be teaching this course

shin-ubc-2013Leo K. Shin is Associate Professor of History and Asian Studies at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver. A former reporter for The Hong Kong Standard, he is the author of The Making of the Chinese State: Ethnicity and Expansion on the Ming Borderlands (Cambridge, 2006) and editor of a volume in the Dang dai xi fang Han xue yan jiu ji cui [Selected contemporary Western scholarship on Chinese studies] 當代西方漢學研究集萃 series (Shanghai, 2012).