FATHERS AND DAUGHTERS IN CHINESE BUDDHISM – LECTURE BY WENDI ADAMEK

Although, father-daughter conflict and reconciliation famously drives the plot of The Precious Scroll of Incense Mountain, a 16th-century tale of the bodhisattva Avalokiteśvara’s past life as  rincess Miaoshan, much could be said about earlier material on filial Buddhist daughters. In the 7th century, a Buddhist nun named Zhijue dedicated a niche and wrote a memorial for her father, a respected magistrate. The memorial is full of praise for his commitment to Buddhist practice, and it appears that she and her father were united against the rest of their family. In the 8th century, filial and master-disciple devotion appear to dovetail in the accounts of two female followers of the Chan Master Wuzhu. Finally, I look at a wellloved Chan/Zen fictional character: Lingzhao, the daughter of Layman Pang, who was said to have died in the ninth century. In these three accounts, we see literary and cultural conventions re-negotiated and re-appropriated in various ways.

Friday, April 10, 2015
3pm – 4:30pm *TIME CHANGE EVENT NOW STARTS AT 4PM*
Asian Centre Auditorium, 1871 West Mall

wendi