Islam and Empire in India

The Padshah’s Sacred Authority and Religious Pluralism in Mughal Times

With speaker Corinne Lefèvre, CEIAS (Le Centre d’Études de l’Inde et de l’Asie du Sud)/CNRS-EHESS (L’Ecole Des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales).

To what extent may the Mughal empire be described as an Islamic state? Were Mughal times a golden age of interreligious harmony between Muslims and Hindus or, on the contrary, a dark age of discrimination and persecution for non- Muslims? Was there such thing as Mughal Islam and, if so, what were its characteristics? To shed light on these long and hotly debated questions, I will start by examining the major forms of “imperial Islam” that were elaborated and practiced by successive Mughal rulers and their close associates. I will then proceed to delineate the different types of interactions (financial support, hostility and intellectual curiosity) that existed between political power and the various religious communities and traditions present in the empire.

Thursday, November 3, 2016

4 – 5 p.m.
Lecture in UBC Asian Centre Auditorium

5 – 6 p.m.
Reception in lobby

UBC Asian Centre, 1871 West Mall, UBC Point Grey Campus

Sponsored by the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies/French Consulate French Scholar Speaker Series & the Department of Asian Studies

Akbar and the Jesuits, from the Akbarnama ("The Book of Akbar ") by Narsingh, c. 1600-03, India, Leabharlann Chester Beatty Library, In 03.263

Akbar and the Jesuits, from the Akbarnama (“The Book of Akbar “) by Narsingh, c. 1600-03, India, Leabharlann Chester Beatty Library, In 03.263