Sex and the Stereoscopic City in Kanshi: Mori Ōgai and Niigata

With guest speaker John Timothy Wixted

Mori Ogai as an officer. Published by 東洋文化協會 (The Eastern Culture Association) - The Japanese book "幕末・明治・大正 回顧八十年史" (Memories for 80 years, Bakumatsu, Meiji, Taisho). Image used under Public Domain.

Mori Ogai as an officer. Published by 東洋文化協會 (The Eastern Culture Association) – The Japanese book “幕末・明治・大正 回顧八十年史” (Memories for 80 years, Bakumatsu, Meiji, Taisho). Image used under Public Domain.

Thursday, September 29th, 2016
12:30pm – 2pm
Room 604, Asian Centre, 1871 West Mall

Cosponsored by the Centre for Japanese Research and the Department of Asian Studies

About the Speaker

wixted-photo-for-ubcJohn Timothy Wixted (B.A. Toronto, M.A. Stanford, D.Phil. Oxford) is Professor Emeritus of Asian Languages (Chinese and Japanese Languages and Literatures) at Arizona State Uni­versity. The author of A Handbook to Classical Japanese, he has written books on Chinese poets of the ninth century (Wei Zhuang) and thirteenth century (Yuan Haowen), translated Yoshikawa Kōji­rō’s Five Hundred Years of Chinese Poetry, 1150-1650, and published Japanese Scholars of China: A Bibliographic Handbook. Retired in Michigan, he is curently an affiliate of the East Asian centers at the univer­sities of Chicago, Michigan, and Notre Dame.

Professor Wixted has written several articles on kanshi (Sino-Japanese poetry). His talk, “Sex and the Stereoscopic City in Kanshi: Mori Ōgai and Niigata,” will treat selections from two series that Mori Ōgai (1862-1922) wrote when on expedition in northern Japan as a twenty-year-old army officer. In addition to their intrinsic interest, the poems throw much light on prostitution of the time, complement Ōgai’s views of women in his more famous writings, and provide the first example of the author’s stereoscopic treatment of a theme.