Meet our Students

Kiran Sunar

Ph.D. Student - Punjabi Cultural History/Literature
My research engages the study of gender, sexuality, and the fantastical looking at the multilingual cornucopia of literary traditions in the early modern period (15th to 17th century) and their interactions with each other.

READ MORE >>


Meet our Students: Peder Gedda

Ph.D. Student - Sikh History
My research is focused on translating, contextualising and analysing a series of Sikh etiquette manuals (rahitname) composed in the early 18th century in North India. I hope that my research can shed some light on this genre of literature as well as its period of composition, since both deserve more scholarly attention.

READ MORE >>


Julie Vig

Ph.D. Student - Early modern North Indian literature
My dissertation wishes to engage with gurbilās literature as a literary genre that was not only part of the Sikh and Punjabi world but also part of the wider world of Brajbhasha literature.

READ MORE >>


Clayton Ashton

Ph.D. Student - Early Chinese history
I study the political and intellectual history of early China. My dissertation is focused on the period of about 300 BCE. This was a period of history when people were beginning to ask some fascinating and original questions about some big topics that we’re still struggling with today: how to organize a state, how to balance individual desires with collective needs, and what it means to be ethical during a period of upheaval.

READ MORE >>


Gurinder Mann, Asian Studies MA Student

Gurinder Mann

MA Student - Punjabi language and literature
There are a number of reasons why I choose UBC to pursue my studies, the primary of which was the opportunity to work with Dr. Anne Murphy, who is an outstanding Professor, and immensely knowledgeable in South Asian Studies.

READ MORE >>


Ben Whaley

Ph.D. Student - Modern Japanese literature, Graduated 2016
I research Japanese video games (Bleep Bloop!) and write about the ways in which they engage with social issues and national trauma. For my purposes, this means analyzing console games that address issues of natural disasters, a declining birthrate and aging population, and traumatic war memory in Japan.

READ MORE >>


Douglas Ober

Ph.D. Student - Modern Indian buddhism
My dissertation rests at the intersection of South Asian history and Buddhist studies. Put simply, the conventional view in academia (and beyond) is that sometime between the 12th – 15th century, Buddhism “died” or “disappeared” from India before being “reborn” in 1956 when the Indian constitutionalist, Dr. B.R. Ambedkar, converted to Buddhism along with half a million of his Dalit (“Untouchable”) followers.

READ MORE >>