My Life as I Remember It

Dan Overmyer Masters Degree 1953

by Daniel L. Overmyer

I write this informal memoir in the hope that it will be of interest to my grandchildren as they grow older (Sarai, Maceo and Adan Hertz-Velázquez and Amara and Zoe Overmyer). It is based on what I remember, supplemented by comments from my mother Bernice, my wife Estella and my sister, Mary Beth Twining. This is not intended to be a research essay, but I have checked some written sources. I realize that memories can be unreliable, and particularly for my early years have been constructed by what I have been told by and what I have told to others. On the whole I have had a good, satisfying and happy life, for which I am deeply grateful to my family, friends and colleagues, and to the marvelous universe from which my life emerged and to which, eventually, it will return. This memoir is meant to be read along with my Curriculum Vitae, of which the most recent version is dated June 30, 2010. The reader should also look at the many wonderful family photo albums organized by Estella, including photos taken on our many trips.

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THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

Publications Record

SURNAME:          OVERMYER              FIRST NAME:      Daniel
Initials:

MIDDLE NAME(S):                                Date:    April 30, 2007

3.         BOOKS

R*   Folk Buddhist Religion: Dissenting Sects in Late Traditional China. 259 pp. plus glossary, bibliography and index. Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press, June, 1976. Harvard East Asian Series, #83.

R*   The Flying Phoenix: Aspects of Chinese Sectarianism in Taiwan, by David K. Jordan and Daniel L. Overmyer. Princeton, Princeton University Press, 1986. 329 pages.

R*   Religions of China: The World as a Living System. San Francisco, Harper & Row, Publishers, March, 1986. This is an introductory textbook in a series intended for first year university students, “Religious Traditions of the World”. 125 pages. This was reprinted with its nine co-volumes in a single volume edited by Byron H. Earhart,Religious Traditions of the World, also by Harper, 1992.

R*   A Chinese translation of Folk Buddhist  Religion: Dissenting Sects in Late Traditional China. by Zhou Yumin and others (Dept. of History at the Shanghai Normal University), Zhong-guo min-jian zong-jiao jiao-pai yan-jiu  [A study of Chinese folk-religious sects].  Shanghai, Chinese Classics Publishing House, 1993.

R*   Precious Volumes: An Introduction to Chinese Sectarian Scriptures from the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries, Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Asia Center, 1999. 444 pages. Harvard-Yenching Monograph Series, 49.

R*   Fei Luan.  A Chinese translation of the Flying Phoenix book, translated by Zhou Yumin, edited by Sung Kuang-yu.   Hong Kong : Chinese University of Hong Kong Press, 2005.

R*   Ethnography in China Today: A Critical Assessment of Methods and Results. Edited, wrote the Introduction and one chapter. Taipei, Taiwan, Yuan-liou Publishing Co. Ltd., 2002.

 R*     Interpretations of Hope in Chinese Religions and Christianity, co-edited with Lai Chi Tim. Wrote one chapter. Hong Kong, 2005.

R*   The China Quarterly Special Issue: Religion in China Today, (No.174, June 2003). Edited and wrote the introduction. (This was also published as the book Religion in China Today, less the book reviews).

R*   Religion in China Today, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2003. Edited and wrote the introduction.

R*   A Japanese translation of the 1976 Folk Buddhist Religion book,  Chogoku minkan Bukkyo kyoha no kenkyu,translated by Rimbara Fumiko and Ito Michiharu.  Tokyo, Kenbun shuppan, 2005.

            Edited an wrote Introductions and English Language summaries of fifty-six reports by Chinese local scholars in Hebei Province for the

         Series: Huabei nongcun minjian wenhua yanjiu (Collection of studies of popular culture in north China villages), co-edited with Fan Lizhu and others, Tianjin: Tianjin guji chubanshe, 2006-2007.  The four volumes of this series have now been published, in 1543 pages. .

      R.   Local Religion in North China in the Twentieth Century: The Structure and Organization of Community Rituals and Beliefs.  Leiden,  Brill,  2009.

      R.  Asian Religions in British Columbia, co-edited with Don Baker and Larry DeVries.  A book of twelve reports by B.C. local scholars.  Vancouver, B.C., University of British Columbia Press, 2010.

       R.  “ Special Issue, Women in Chinese Religions”, Min-su ch’u-i (Journal of Chinese Ritual, Theatre and Folklore), No. 168, June 2010, edited and wrote the Introduction.

1.         REFEREED PUBLICATIONS

(a)        Journal articles and book chapters

*     “Folk-Buddhist Religion: Creation and Eschatology in Medieval China,” History of Religions, 12.1: 42-70 (August 1972).

*     Boatmen and Buddhas: The Lo chiao in Ming Dynasty China.” History of Religions, 17.3-4: 284-302, (February–May 1978).

*     “Dualism and Conflict in Chinese Popular Religion.” Frank E. Reynolds and Theodore Ludwig, eds., Transitions and Transformations in the History of Religions: Supplements to Numen Series, Leiden: E.J. Brill, 1980, pp. 153–184.

      Four articles for the Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions (Nashville, Tenn., 1981): “Chinese Popular Religion” (3000 words). “Feng-shui” (500 words). “Household Gods” (500 words). “White Lotus Society” (250 words), pp. 164-168, 257-258-329 and 804.

*     “Alternatives: Popular Religious Sects in Chinese Society,” Modern China 7:2: 153-190, (April 1981).

*     “The White Cloud Sect in Sung and Yüan China,” Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies, 42:2: 615-642, (December 1982).

*     “Attitudes Toward the Ruler and State in Chinese Popular Religious Literature; Sixteenth and Seventeenth Century Pao-chüan,” Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies,  44:2: 347–379, (December 1984).

*     “Values in Chinese Sectarian Literature: Ming and Ch’ing Pao-chüan,”” Popular Culture in Late Imperial China: Diversity and Integration, edited by David Johnson, Andrew J. Nathan and Evelyn S. Rawski. Berkeley, U. of California Press, 1985, pp. 219–254.

*     “Chinese Religions: A Historical Overview,” in The Encyclopedia of Religion. New York, Macmillan Publishing Co., 1987, 3:257–289. (This article was reprinted in a volume of selections from the Encyclopedia edited by Joseph M. Kitagawa, entitled The Religous Traditions of Asia, New York, Macmillan, 1989).

*     Messenger, Saviour and Revolutionary:  Roles of Maitreya in Chinese Popular Religious Literature.” In Helen Hardacre and Alan Sponberg, editors, Maitreya, The Future Buddha, New York, Cambridge University Press, 1988, pp.110–134.

*     “Buddhism in the Trenches: Attitudes Toward Popular Religion in Chinese Scriptures found at Tun-huang,” inHarvard Journal of Asiatic Studies, 50.1:197-222 (June 1990).

*     “Attitudes Toward Popular Religion in Ritual Texts of the Chinese State: The Collected Statutes of the Great Ming.” Cahiers d’Extrême-Asie, (Publication of Section de Kyoto, École Française d’Extrême Orient), 5:191-221 (1990).

      “Glowing Coals: The first twenty-five years of the Department of Asian Studies at the University of British Columbia, 1960–1985,” in B.C. Asian Review,  3–4: 1-27 (1990).

*     “Women in Chinese Religions: Submission, Struggle, Transcendence.” In Gregory Schopen and Koichi Shinohara, eds., From Benares to Beijing: Essays on Buddhism and Chinese Religions in Honour of Prof. Jan Yun-hua, Oakville, Ontario, Mosaic Press , 1991, pp 91-120.

*     Co-authored with Thomas S.Y. Li, “The Oldest Chinese Sectarian Scripture, The Precious Volume Expounded by the Buddha, on the Results of [the teaching of] the Imperial Ultimate Period.” Journal of Chinese Religions, 20: 17-31 (1992).

*     “Chinese Religions: the State of the Field,” Parts I and II, Journal of Asian Studies, 54, no. 1 (February 1995): 124-160, and 54, no. 2 (May 1995): 314-395 (with ten co-authors, originated, edited and with introductions by D.L. Overmyer).

*     Review article on “Proceedings of [the] International Conference on Popular Beliefs and Chinese Culture”, (Center for Chinese Studies, Taipei,. Taiwan, R.O.C., April, 1994), Journal of Chinese Religions, 23: 147–155 (Fall 1995).

*     “Chinese Religions as Part of the History of Salvation: a Dialogue with Christianity”, Ching Feng, 40:1.1–14, March 1997.

*     “Convergence: Chinese Gods and Christian Saints,” Ching Feng 40:3–4.215–232 (September–December, 1997).

*     “Social Perspectives in Chinese Sectarian Scriptures from the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries” to be published in Civil Society in East Asia: History, Concepts, Institution.  Proceedings of the Vth Symposium of the North American-European Joint Committee for Cooperation in East Asian Studies, edited by Charles Le Blanc and Alain Rocher, 1998, pp. 7–35.

*     Review article on Poo Mu-chou, In Search of Personal Welfare: a View of Ancient Chinese Religion (Albany, State University of New York Press, 1998). Journal of Chinese Religions 26: 172–176 (1998).

*     “Quan-zhen Daoist Influence on Sectarian “Precious Volumes” from the Seventeenth Century.” Daojiao yu Minjian Zongjiao Yanjiu Lunji (Research articles on Daoism and [Chinese] popular religion), edited by Lai Chi Tim. Hong Kong, Xuefang Wenhua shiye Co., 1999, pp. 73–93.

(a)  Journals (cont.)

*     Book Chapter: “On the Foundations of Chinese Culture in Late Traditional Times: Comments on Fang Xuejia, ed., Meizhou diqu de miaohui yu zongzu (The lineages and temple festivals of the Meizhou area) and his Meizhou Heyuan diqu de cunluo wenhua (Village religion & culture).” In Ethnography in China Today: A Critical Assessment of Methods and Results, edited by D.L. Overmyer. 2002, pp. 313–342.

*     “From ‘Feudal Superstition’ to ‘Popular Beliefs’: New Directions in Mainland Chinese Studies of Chinese Popular Religion,” Cahiers d’Extrême Asie, 12: 105–128 (2001).

*     “Introduction” to The China Quarterly 174 (June 2003), Special Issue on Religion in China Today.

*     “Shenming, shengtu, lingmei he raojing: cong Zhongguo wenhua guandian bijiao difang minjian xinyang chuantong” (Gods, saints, spirit-mediums and processions: comparing local religious traditions from the point of view of Chinese culture) Taiwan Journal of Religious Studies 2:2.1–16 (June 2003).

       “Lishi, wenxian he shidi diaocha—yanjiu Zhongguo zongjiao de zonghe fangfa”, (History, texts and fieldwork—a combined method for the study of Chinese religions), in Journal of History and Anthropology 2:1.197–205 (April 2004).

*     “Ritual Leaders in North China Local Communities in the Twentieth Century: A Report on Research in Progress”,  Min-su ch’u-I (Journal of Chinese Ritual, Theatre and Folklore)  153:203-263 (2006.9)

*   “Chinese Religious Traditions from 1900-2005: an Overview”, pp. 173-197 in The Cambridge Companion to Modern Chinese Culture,  Edited by Kam Louie, Cambridge University Press,  2008.

2.         NON-REFEREED PUBLICATIONS

(a)        Journals

      “The Chinese Reformation” (Sectarian background of Maoism), The Seminary Review, Spring 1970,
pp. 3–16.

      “Acceptance in Context: Death and Traditional China.” Fred H. Holck, ed., Death and Eastern Thought, Nashville, Abingdon Press, 1974, pp. 198–225.

      “A Preliminary Study of the Tz’u-hui t’ang, a Contemporary Religious Sect on Taiwan,” Society for the Study of Chinese Religions Bulletin, 4: 19-40, (October 1977).

      Shih-shuo hsin-yü: A New Account of Tales of the World, by Liu I-ch’ing with commentary by Liu Chun. Translated with introduction and notes by Richard B. Mather. Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press, 1976, inHistory of Religions, 17.2: 194-20, (November 1977), (review article).

      “Chinese Studies: Some Contributions to the Humanities”, U.B.C. Artsnews  February, 1995.  (A Chinese translation of this was published in Zhongguo yanjiu , May, 1995).

      “Taiwan Tz’u-hui t’ang te k’ao-ch’a”, Min-chien tsung-chiao  1:83-91 (1995) (This is a translation by Zhou Yumin of a chapter from my book The Flying Phoenix, co-authored with David Jordan).

      “Gods, saints, shamans and processions: comparative religion from the bottom up”, in Criterion 41.3:2–9, 34.

       “The World as a Holy Place”, TREKThe Magazine of the University of British Columbia, Vol. 12,  Summer 2005, pp.14-17.  Also published in Humanist Perspectives 157:20-22 (Summer 2006),  and Anpere.net Newsletter (April 2007, an online journal  of anthropological perspectives on religion).

(b)        Conference Proceedings

(c)        Other

Book reviews to 2000; continued to publish reviews after this date but have not included them here. (Review articles are listed above).

      “Undisturbed Narration,” a review of D.H. Smith, Chinese Religions. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1968. History of Religions, Vol. 9, Nos. 2 and 3, November 1969/February 1970, pp. 256–260.

      Chesneaux, Jean, ed., Popular Movements and Secret Societies in China. Stanford, 1972. The American Political Science Review, 68.4: 1795-1797 (1974).

      Religious Studies Review, Vol. 2, No. 1, January 1976, pp. 32–33.

      Ahern, Emily M., The Cult of the Dead in a Chinese Village. Stanford, Stanford University Press, 1973.

Book reviews to 2000: (cont.)

      Jordan, David K., Gods, Ghosts and Ancestors: The Folk Religion of a Taiwanese Village. Berkeley, University of California Press, 1972.

      Wolf, Arthur P., ed., Religion and Ritual in Chinese Society. Stanford, Stanford University Press, 1974,
Vol. 2, No. 4, October 1976, p. 38:

      Bodde, Derk, Festivals in Classical China: New Year and other Annual Observances during the Han Dynasty 206 B.C.–A.D. 220. Princeton, N.J., Princeton University Press, 1975.

      (Note: the above four items are short book notes in the Religious Studies Review)

      “Exorcism and Renewal in Ancient China,” a review of Derk Bodde, Festivals in Classical China: New Year and other Annual Observances during the Han Dynasty 206 B.C.–A.D. 220. Princeton, N.J., Princeton University Press, 1975, History of Religions 17:1: 86-89 (August 1977).

      Granet, Marcel, The Religion of the Chinese People, tr. Maurice Freedman, New York, Harper and Row, 1975,Journal of Asian Studies, 37.1: 107-108 (November 1977).

      Hsu, Sung-peng, A Buddhist Leader in Ming China: The Life and Thought of  Han-shan Te-ch’ing. University Park, The Pennsylvania State University Press, 1979. Journal of Asian Studies, May 1980, pp. 548–550.

      Berling, Judith A., The Syncretic Religion of Lin Chao-en. New York, Columbia University Press, 1980. Journal of Asian Studies, XLI.1: 95–96 (November 1981 ).

      Saso, Michael and David Chappell, eds., Buddhist and Taoist Studies, I. Honolulu, University Press of Hawaii, 1977. Journal of the American Oriental Society, 100.1: 89-30 (1980).

      Amore, Roy C., ed., Developments in Buddhist Thought: Canadian Contributions to Buddhist Studies. Waterloo, Ontario, Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 1974. Philosophy East and West, July 1981, pp. 383–385.

      Yü, Anthony C., ed. and trans., The Journey to the West, Vol. I. Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 1977.The Christian Century, October 19, 1977, pp . 958–960 .

      Eliade, Mircea, Autobiography, Volume 1:  1907-1937, Journey East, JourneyWest, translated by MacLinscott Ricketts. San Francisco, Harper and Row Publishers, 1981. The Christian Century, April 14, 1982, pp. 453–454.

      Naquin, Susan, Shantung Rebellion: The Wang Lun Uprising of 1774. New Haven, Yale University Press, 1981.The China Quarterly, 1982.

      Chan, Hok-lam and Wm. Theodore de Bary, eds., Yuan Thought: Chinese Thought and Religion Under the Mongols. New York, Columbia University Press, 1982. Ming Studies, 1984.

      Smith, Richard J., China‘s Cultural Heritage: The Ch’ing Dynasty, 1644–1912. Boulder, Westview Press, 1983.Ming Studies, Spring 1985.

      Henderson, John B., The Development and Decline of Chinese Cosmology. New York, Columbia University Press, 1984. The American Historical Review, December 1985.

      Gimello, Robert M. and Peter N. Gregory, eds., Studies in Ch’an and Hua-yen. Honolulu, University of Hawaii Press, 1983. Journal of Asian Studies, May 1985.

      Paul, Diana Y. Women in Buddhism: Images of the Feminine in the Mahayana Tradition, 2nd edition. Berkeley, University of California Press, 1985. Journal of Asian Studies, May 1986.

      De Vos, George A. and Takao Sofue, eds., Religion and the Family in East Asia. Berkeley, CA, U. of California Press, 1986. Journal of Asian Studies, February, 1988.

      Weinstein, Stanley, Buddhism Under the T’ang. New York, Cambridge University Press, 1987. American Historical Review, June, 1988.

      Huang Tsung-hsi, Records of Ming Scholars. A Selected Translation. Ed. Julia Ching. Honolulu, University of Hawaii Press, 1987. Journal of the American Academy of Religion, 1988

      Yü Song-qing, Ming Qing Bai-lien jiao yan-chiu (A study of Ming and Qing White Lotus sects), Chengdu, Sichuan ren-min chu-banshe, 1987. Cahiers d’Extrême-Asie, 1988.

      Larson, Gerald James and Eliot Deutsch, eds., Interpreting Across Boundaries: New Essays in Com­parative Philosophy. Princeton, Princeton University Press, 1988. Journal of Asian Studies, August, 1989.

Book reviews to 2000: (cont.)

      Brook, Timothy, Geographical Sources of Ming-Qing History. Ann Arbor, Center for Chinese Studies, U. of Michigan, 1988. Canadian Journal of History, August, 1989.

      Rubenstein, Murray A., The Protestant Community on Modern Taiwan: Mission, Seminary and Church. New York and London, M.E. Sharpe, 1991. Journal of Asian Studies 51.1: 156–158 (February 1992).

      ter Haar, B.J., The White Lotus Teachings in Chinese Religious History.   Leiden, E.J. Brill, 1922.  Journal of Asian Studies  51.4: 908-909 (November 1992).

      Tong, James W., Disorder under Heaven:  Collective Violence in the Ming Dynasty.   Stanford, Stanford University Press, 1991.  Canadian Journal of History  XXVII: 586-587 (December 1992)

      Robinet, Isabelle.  Taoist Meditation: The Mao-shan Tradition of Great Purity, (New York: SUNY Press, 1993). Studies in Religion.

      Brook, Timothy.  Praying for Power:  Buddhism and the Formation of Gentry Society in Late Ming China(Cambridge, MA, 1993).  Canadian Journal of History XXIX; 609-611 (December 1994).

      Murray, Dian H., with Qin Baoqi.  The Origins of the Tiandihui: The Chinese Triads in Legend and History (Stanford, CA, 1994).  Journal of the American Oriental Society, 115.4 (1995).

      Ching, Julia.  Chinese Religions  (Mary Knoll, 1993).  China Review International, 2.2: 418-420 (Fall 1995).

      Robinet, Isabelle.  Taoism: Growth of a Religion. Translated by Phyllis Brooks (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1997). China Review International 5:2.219–221 (Fall 1998).

      McLaren, Anne E. Chinese Popular Culture and Ming Chantefables (Leiden, E.J. Brill, 1998). Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies, Vol. 59, No. 2, 1999. Pp. 629–637.

Reviews in Pacific Affairs :

      DeBary, Wm. Theodore, ed., The Unfolding of Neo-Confucianism, New York, Columbia University Press, 1975, Vol. 49, No. 1: 120–122 (Spring 1976).

      Pokora, Timoteus, tr., Hsin-lun (New Treatiseand Other Writings by Huan T’an (43 B.C.–28 A.D., Ann Arbor: Center for Chinese Studies, University of Michigan, 1975, Vol. 49, No. 1: 179–180 (Spring 1976).

      Tu Wei-ming, Centrality and Commonality. An Essay on Chung-yung, Honolulu, University Press of Hawaii, 1976, Vol. 50.1:130-131 (Spring 1977).

      Tu Wei-ming, Neo-Confucian thought in Action: Wang Yang-ming’s Youth, Berkeley, University of California Press, 1976, Vol. 50, No. 2 (Summer 1977), pp. 300–301.

      Posner, Arlene and Arne J. de Keijzer, eds., China: A Resource and Curriculum Guide (second edition, revised). Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 1976, Vol. 49, No. 4 (Winter 1976–77), pp. 752–753.

      Naquin, Susan, Millenarian Rebellion in China: The Eight Trigrams Uprising of 1813. New Haven, Yale University Press, 1976, Vol. 51, No. 1 (Spring 1978), pp. 112–113.

      Metzger, Thomas A., Escape from Predicament: Neo-Confucianism and China’s Evolving Political Culture. New York, Columbia University Press, 1977, 50.4: 686-687 (Winter 1977–78).

      Liu Ts’un-yan, Selected Papers from the Hall of Harmonious Wind. Leiden, E.J. Brill, 1977, 50.4: 699-700 (Winter 1977–78).

      Welch, Holmes and Anna Seidel, eds., Facets of Taoism. New Haven, Yale University Press, 1979, 52.4: 722-724 (Winter 1979–80).

      Maspero, Henri, Taoism and Chinese Religion. Translated by Frank A. Kierman, Jr., Amherst, The University of Massachusetts Press, 1981, 55.2: 284-286 (Summer 1982).

      Hsiao Kung-chuan, A History of Chinese Political Thought, Volume I: From the Beginnings to the Sixth Cen­tury A.D. Translated by F.W. Mote, Princeton, Princeton University Press, 1979, 55.3: 477-479 (Fall 1982).

      Handlin, Joanna F., Action in Late Ming Thought. The Re-orientation of Lu K’un and Other Scholar-Officials. Berkeley, University of California Press, 1983 (Fall 1984).

      Mair, Victor H., Tun-huang Popular Narratives. London, Cambridge University Press, 1983 (Spring 1985).

Reviews in Pacific Affairs: (cont.)

      Yu, David C., Guide to Chinese Religion. Boston, G.K. Hall and Co., 1985 (Spring 1986).

      Munro, Donald, Ed., Individualism and Holism: Studies in Confucian and Taoist Values. Ann Arbor, U. of Michigan, Center for Chinese Studies, 1985 (1987).

      Watson, James L. and Evelyn S. Rawski, eds., Death Ritual in Late Imperial and Modern China. Berkeley, University of California Press, 1988. (1989).

      Kuhn, P.A. Soulstealers: The Chinese Sorcery Scare of 1768 (Cambridge MA, Harvard University Press. 64.4: 560–561.

      Dean, Kenneth,  Taoist Ritual and Popular Cults of Southeast China.  Princeton, N.J. Princeton University Press, 1993.  67.2 (August 1994).

      Hinsch, Brett.  Passions of the Cut Sleeve:  The Male Homosexual Tradition in China  (Berkeley, 1990). Pacific Affairs 67.3: 483-484 (Fall 1994)

      Chong, Ken Ray.  Cannibalism in China  (Wakefield, NH, 1990).  Pacific Affairs  67.3: 483-484 (Fall 1994).

      Gernet, Jacques. Buddhism in Chinese Society (New York, Columbia University Press, 1995) 64:4.596–597 (Winter 1995–1996).

      Gedalecia, The Philosophy of W’u Ch’eng: A Neo-Confucian of the Yuan Dynasty. Bloomington (Indiana):Research Institute for Inner Asian Studies, Indiana University, 1999.

      Hubbard, Jamie, Absolute Delusion, Perfect Buddhahood: The Rise and Fall of a Chinese Heresy, Honolulu, University of Hawaii Press, 2002. In Pacific Affairs.

b)   Conference presentations (= research papers given)

“The Wu-wei sect of the Ming Dynasty,” Northwest Regional Seminar on China, Western Washington State College, May 4, 1974. At the same seminar meeting I was also a discussant in a panel on “The Notion of Orthodoxy from Max Weber’s Religion of China.’

“The Tz’u-hui t’ang: A Contemporary Religious Sect on Taiwan,” Canadian Society for Asian Studies, annual meeting, June 2, 1974, University of Toronto. I read this same paper at a meeting of the Honors/Asian Studies Colloquium, University of Puget Sound, on October 18, 1974 (invited lecture). Published as part of my Flying Phoenix book.

“Ming Dynasty Popular Scriptures: An Introduction to the Pao-chüan of Lo Ch’ing and his Wu-wei chiao,” read at the meeting of the Society for the Study of Chinese Religions, held in conjunction with the Association for Asian Studies, Toronto, March 19, 1976, 22 typed pages (partly incorporated into the article “Values in Chinese Sectarian Literature”, published 1985).

“Unity and Diversity in Chinese Religion,” in a panel on “Elite and Folk Religions,” Northwest Regional Seminar on China, University of Washington, April 24, 1976. Oral presentation.

“Boatman and Buddhas: the Lo chiao in Ming Dynasty China,” 30 International Congress of Human Sciences in Asia and North Africa, Mexico City, August 7, 1976. Published.

“Chinese Religions; the State of the Art,” Regional Seminar, Center for Chinese Studies, University of California, Berkeley, Feb. 12, 1977.

“Dualism and Conflict in Chinese Popular Religion,” Annual meeting, Asian Studies on the Pacific Coast, Eugene, Oregon, June 18, 1977.  Published.

Pao-chüan: Types and Transformations,” Annual meeting, Association for Asian Studies, Chicago, Illinois, March 31, 1978, 46 typed pages.

“The Sayings of Chairman Lü: Popular Religious Texts in Taiwan,” Harvard University, Conference on “High Culture and Popular Culture in East Asia,” August 24, 1978, 54 typed pages (mostly included in the book, The Flying Phoenix ).

“Values and Communication in Chinese Popular Culture: Some Suggestions for Discussion,” Planning meeting for a workshop on “Values and Communications in Chinese Popular Culture,” sponsored by the American Council of Learned Societies, Committee on Studies of Chinese Civilization, at Columbia University, New York, January 13, 1979. Oral presentation.

“Alternatives: Popular Religious Sects in Chinese Society,” Harvard, workshop on “Rebellion and Revolution in North China: Late Ming to the Present,” Harvard University, August, 1979. Published.

b)   Conference presentations (= research papers given) (cont.)

“The White Cloud Sect in Sung and Yüan China,” American Academy of Religion, annual meeting , Dallas, Texas, November, 1980. Published.

“Values in Chinese Sectarian Literature, Mid-Ming to the Twentieth Century,” Part I: Pao-chüan,” conference on “Values and Communication in Chinese Popular Culture,” sponsored by the ACLS and the East-West Center, University of Hawaii, January 2–6, 1981. I presented this paper earlier (in oral form only) at a meeting of the “East Asian Coffee Hour,” Princeton University, Princeton, N.J., November 5, 1980.

“Values in Chinese Sectarian Literature, Mid-Ming to the Present, Part II, Spirit-writing Texts,” Association for Asian Studies, Toronto, Ontario, March 14, 1981. (Panel sponsored by the Society for the Study of Chinese Religions.) Incorporated in book manuscript “The Flying Phoenix.”

“Values in Pao-chüan Literature,” conference on “China in the Seventeenth Century,” Moscow, USSR, June 15–18, 1982, co-sponsored by the Soviet Academy of Sciences and the American Council of Learned Societies. Oral presentation.

“Attitudes toward the Ruler and State in Chinese Popular Religious Literature: Sixteenth and Seventeenth CenturyPao-chüan,” the Princeton Conference on Maitreya Studies, May 1–3, 1983. Published.

I also gave three lectures in China in 1981 (in Chinese):
“Methodology of the History of Religions,” Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Beijing.

“The White Cloud and White Lotus Schools of the Sung and Yüan Dynasties,” Department of History, Nanjing University.

“Ming and Ch’ing Popular Religious Sects,” Department of History, Nanjing University.

“Messenger, Saviour and Revolutionary: The Roles of Maitreya in Chinese Popular Religious Literature.” This paper presented at the University of Washington, University of Victoria, U.C.L.A., University of California, Berkeley and Davis, and the University of Heidelberg, 1983–1987. Published.

The Flying Phoenix: Aspects of Chinese Sectarianism in Taiwan. Lectures introducing this book given at the University of California, Berkeley (11/85) and Stanford University (1986).

“Conscious Innovation and New Revelation in Chinese Religions: Some Evidence from Taoism, Buddhism, and Popular Religion,” Society for the Study of Chinese Religions, Boston, AAS, 1987. (Also given at Oberlin College, 1987.)

“Cultural Integration in Late Imperial China: The Case of Popular Religion.” University of Iowa, April, 1988.

“Buddhism in the Trenches: Attitudes Toward Popular Religion in Chinese Indigenous Scriptures from Tun-huang.” Association for Asian Studies, March, 1988; Harvard University, April, 1988. Also presented at the International Conference on Chinese Folk Literature, Taipei, September, 1989. Published.

“Women in Chinese Religions: Submission, Struggle, Transcendence.” Symposium in conjunction with the exhibit “Views from Jade Terrace: Chinese Women Artists, 1300–1912,” Indianapolis Museum of Art, October, 1988.  Published.

“Attitudes Toward Popular Religion in Ritual Texts of the Chinese State: The Collected Statutes of the Great Ming.” Conference sponsored by the Social Science Research Council on “Communities in Question: Religion and Authority in East and Southeast Asia,” Hua-hin, Thailand, May, 1989.

      This paper was also presented at the 1989 Ohio State University College of Humanities Symposium, Columbus, Ohio, March, 1989. Published.

“The Role of Lo Ch’ing (1492–1527) in the Development of Sixteenth and Seventeenth Century Sectarian Scriptures,” Conference on “Rituals and Scriptures of Chinese Popular Religion,” Bodega Bay, CA, January, 1990.

      This paper was also presented at the April 1990 annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies in Chicago.

“The Oldest Chinese Sectarian Scripture”.  UBC Institute of Asian  Research, China/Korea Seminar, February 25, 1992. Published.

“Social Perspectives in Chinese Sectarian Scriptures from the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries,” Symposium on “Civil Society in East Asian Countries,” Joint Committee for European-North American Cooperation in East Asian Studies, meeting at the University of Montreal, October, 1992.  This paper also presented at the University of Heidelberg and at Oxford University in the summer of 1993. Published.

“Why Study Religion” and “Chinese Popular Religion,” Dept. of History, Zhongshan University, Guangzhou, China, May, 1997.

b)   Conference presentations (= research papers given) (cont.)

Papers and invited lectures: “The order and inner logic of Chinese popular religion”; presented at the Chinese University on March 10, 1998; also presented at the Academia Sinica in Taiwan in May and at Shanghai Normal University in June, 1998 and at St. John’s College, UBC, October 7, 1998.

Review report on the book Meizhou Heyuan diqu de cunluo wenhau (The village culture of the Heyuan area of Meizhou, Guangdong province), 1997, conference on “Ethnography in China Today”, Chinese University of Hong Kong, May 14–16, 1998.

“History, texts and fieldwork: a combined approach to the study of Chinese religions”, presented at a conference on “Problems and methods in the study of religion”, Taiwan, July, 1998. This conference was co-sponsored by the National Chengchi University and the Academia Sinica.

“Current Chinese studies of Chinese popular religion: a review report,” annual meeting, Society for the Study of Chinese Religions, Association of Asian Studies, Boston, March 13, 1999.

Three lectures on Chinese popular religion and popular religious texts, Luminary Buddhist Institute, Chia-yi, Taiwan, June, 1999. (This is a training centre for nuns).

“The order and inner logic of Chinese popular religion” (modified version of that listed above; in Chinese), International Conference of Religious Studies: Meeting the Millennium, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. December 30, 1999–January 1, 2000. This paper was also presented in China at Nankai University in Tianjin and Fudan University in Shanghai in 2000 and 2001 (in Chinese).

“From ‘Feudal Superstition’ to ‘Popular Beliefs’; New Directions in Chinese Studies of Chinese Popular Religion,” Regional China Colloquium, Simon Fraser University, Harbour Centre, March 4, 2000 (a draft version of the lecture given in Hong Kong in May, 2000 (see below)).

“Why study religion: an academic and personal discussion, with illustrations from Chinese religion and philosophy,” Inaugural Lecture in Religion and Mythology, Langara College, March 14, 2000.

“From ‘Feudal Superstition’ to ‘Popular Beliefs’; New Directions in Chinese Studies of Chinese Popular Religion,” International Conference on Religion and Chinese Society: The Transformation of a Field and Its Implications for the Study of Chinese Culture,” Chinese University of Hong Kong, May 29–June 2, 2000. Published.

“Ethnography in China Today: A Critical Assessment of Methods and Results; A Report on the conference volume (in Chinese). Conference on [Chinese] Ritual, Theatre and Folklore, National Tsing-hua University, Taiwan, June 5–7, 2000. Book published.

Discussant, panel on “Anthropology: Beliefs and Life,” Third International Conference on Sinology, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, June 29–July 1, 2000.

“The role and function of Daoist priests and rituals in Chinese popular religion, with illustrations from Fujian, Hong Kong, and Jiangxi,” inaugural lecture in a series on Daoism, Department of History, Nankai University, Tianjin, China, July 10, 2000 (in Chinese). Accepted for publication.

“Struggle, Auspicious Times and the Potential for Moral Transformation: The Popular Religious Context of Chinese Sectarian Beliefs about the Destruction and Renewal of the World.” Conference on Chinese Millenialism in Comparative Perspective, Harvard University, April 27–29, 2002.

“Gods, Saints, Shamans and Processions: Comparative Religion from the Bottom Up.” Public lecture, Divinity School. University of Chicago, May 2, 2002 (Lecture given as part of a ceremony in which I received an award for “Alumnus of the Year”) (Published).

“Temple Festivals in Rural North China,” Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, June 6, 2002 and Hong Kong City University, November, 2003. (A report on my field work in Hebei province with two Chinese colleagues. In Chinese).

“Gods, Saints, Shamans and Processions: Comparing Local Religious Traditions from a Chinese Point of View,” public lecture, National Chengchi University, Taipei, Taiwan, June 14, 2002 (in Chinese) (AP) and Hong Kong City University, November, 2003. (published)

“Religion in China Today”, Western Washington University, Oct. 15, 2003, U.B.C. Oct. 24 and Nov. 3, 2003 and Hong Kong City University, November, 2003, University of Otago (New Zealand), Feb. 2004, and at the Headquarters of the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (C.I.A.) in May, 2004.  I discussed this topic again at an orientation workshop for the Commissioners and staff of the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom that was held in Salt Lake City on June 24, 2005.

“Local Religion in North China: the Structure and Organization of Community Rituals and Beliefs”, lectures for the UBC China Studies Group on November 9, 2005 and at Columbia University in New York City on December 15, 2005.  This lecture also presented at the Harvard University Fairbank Center on October 19, 2006, and at the Chinese University of Hong Kong on December 6, 2006.

“Chinese Religious Traditions from 1900-2005: an Overview”,  presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Oriental Society, Western Branch, in Victoria, B.C. on October 14, 2006

“Chinese Religions: Current Situation and Future Prospects”,  Workshop on “China Futures”, The Hudson Institute, Washington, D.C., June 11, 2008.

“The Eternal Venerable Mother (Wusheng laomu) in the Stone Tablet Inscriptions of Mt. Daze in Shandong Province”,  Workshop on the Mt. Daze Inscriptions, Pingdu, Shandong, November, 2008.  (This paper was presented for me by Wang Ch’iu-kuei because I was unable to attend.  To be published in conference proceedings.)

4.         PATENTS

5.         SPECIAL COPYRIGHTS

6.         ARTISTIC WORKS, PERFORMANCES, DESIGNS

7.         OTHER WORKS

8.         WORK SUBMITTED (including publisher and date of submission)

9.         WORK IN PROGRESS (including degree of completion)

         Chinese translation of Precious Volumes, in press.

Up-Dated: March 20th, 2016

THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

Curriculum Vitae for Faculty Members

 

Date: March 20, 2016 Initials: D.O.

 

  1. SURNAME: Overmyer FIRST NAME: Daniel L.

MIDDLE NAME(S):

  1. DEPARTMENT/SCHOOL: Asian Studies
  2. FACULTY: Arts
  3. PRESENT RANK: Professor Emeritus SINCE: January 1, 2001
    Asian Studies and the Centre for Chinese Research.
    (Also Honorary Professor, Faculty of Arts, Shanghai Normal University)
  4. POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION
University or Institution Degree Subject Area Dates
Westmar College, Le Mars, Iowa
(Also did undergraduate work at the University of Cincinnati and Wheaton College.)
B.A. Biology 1953–57
Evangelical Theological Seminary
Naperville, Illinois
B.D. Church History 1960
University of Chicago M.A. History of Religions 1966
University of Chicago Ph.D. Chinese Religions 1971
Interuniversity Program for Chinese Language Studies (administered by Stanford University)
Taipei, Taiwan
1968–69

Special Professional Qualifications

  1. EMPLOYMENT RECORD

(a) Prior to coming to UBC

University, Company or Organization Rank or Title Dates
Proctor and Gamble Corporation, Cincinnati, Ohio Lab technician 1957
Evangelical United Brethren Church
Chicago, Near North Side
Pastor 1960–64
Chicago Commission on Human Relations
City of Chicago
(part-time while attending University of Chicago)
Director, New Resident’s Services Division 1964–67
Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio, Dept. of Religion
(part of salary paid by East Asian Studies program)
Instructor 1970–71
Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio, Dept. of Religion
(part of salary paid by East Asian Studies program)
Assistant Professor 1971–73

(b) At UBC

Rank or Title Dates
Assistant Professor 1973–1976
Associate Professor July 1, 1976
Professor July 1, 1984–December 31, 2000
Professor Emeritus January 1, 2001

(c) Date of granting of tenure at U.B.C.: July 1, 1977

  1. LEAVES OF ABSENCE

 

University, Company or Organization

at which Leave was taken

Type of Leave Dates
U.B.C. Sabbatical leave at 60% of salary 1978–79
Princeton University Unpaid leave, to permit teaching and research at Princeton University January-June 1983
University of California, Berkeley Sabbatical leave at 75% of salary 1985–86
U.B.C., China Administrative leave at full salary 1991–92
Chinese University of Hong Kong Unpaid leave to teach at the Chinese University of Hong Kong 1996–1998

 

  1. TEACHING

 

(a) Areas of special interest and accomplishments

Courses in Chinese religion and philosophy, undergraduate and graduate.

 

(b) Courses Taught at UBC1989–1995, 1998–2000

Chinese 400, Classical Chinese II

Asian Studies 325 (Phil.323), History of Chinese Thought (now Asia 371 and 372)

Asian Studies 509, Aspects of Chinese Popular Thought and Religion

Asian Studies 365, Daoist Religion and its Philosophical Background (now Asia 381)

Religious Studies 365/366, History of Chinese Religions

Asian Studies/Religious Studies 368, Chinese Popular Religion (now Asia 383)*

Asian Studies 511, Readings in Chinese Religious Texts. and Readings in Daoist Texts

Asian Studies 382/Religious Studies 366, Buddhism in China

 

(The undergraduate courses listed here were all taught for three class hours a week, most since 1973. Their enrollment was always between 30–40, though since 1998 enrollment rose to about 60 in Asia 371 and 40–50 in Asia 381/382/383).

 

* (Asia 383 is now called Common Religious Traditions in China. In the fall of 1995 it was co- taught with Elizabeth Lominska Johnson as “Women in Chinese Religions.)

 

(c) Graduate Students Supervised, Degrees Obtained

Program Year Principal Co-
Student Name Type Start Finish Supervisor Supervisor(s)
Richard van Houten Ph.D. 1981
Roberto Ong M.A. 1981
Stephan Salzberg M.A. 1983
Stephen Eskildsen M.A. 1987 1989
Randall Nadeau Ph.D. 1990
Gary Arbuckle Ph.D. 1991
Josephine Chiu-Duke Ph.D. 1992
Mei-hui Shiau M.A. 1994
Stephen Eskildsen Ph.D. 1989 1994
Laurie Ainbinder M.A. 1992 1996
Philip Clart Ph.D. 1991 1996
Soo Khin Wah Ph.D. 1994 1997
Paul Crowe M.A. 1993 1998
Michael Kardos M.A. 1994 1998
Mary Yeung M.A. 1995 1998
John Johnson M.A. 1993 1999
Sakuraku (Sherry) Tanaka Ph.D. 1995 2000
Mary Ngai M.A. 1998 2003 Co-sup, Ph.d, 2005 ff

 

 

(c) Graduate Students Supervised (cont.)

 

Program Year Principal Co-
Student Name Type Start Finish Supervisor Supervisor(s)
Lilian Chuu M.A. 1998 2001
Rosanna Sze M.A. 1998 2003 Co-sup, Ph.d, 2005 ff
Chao Shin-yi Ph.D. 1995 2003
Mary Yeung Ph.D. 1998 2007
James Nicholson M.A. 1994 2001
Paul Crowe Ph.D. 1998 2004

 

Since retiring at the end of 2000 I have continued to supervise my previous graduate students until they complete their degree work and agreed to be on the committees of Mary Ngai and Rosanna Sze. I have also continued to chair Ph.D examinations for the Graduate Studies Faculty.

 

(d) Continuing Education Activities

 

Led CCE educational tour to north China, 1978.

Talks on Chinese philosophy and religion on CBC “Ideas,” 1994.

McRoberts Senior Secondary, 1994.

“UBC Connect,” 1994.

Alpha Secondary (to teachers), 1994.

Two lectures on Chinese popular religion at the Hong Kong Christian Study Centre.

“Imagine UBC” Faculty Resource person, 1998.

“Revival of Religious Traditions in China,” Vancouver Rotary Club, 2000.

 

(e) Visiting Professor (indicate university/organization and dates)

 

Princeton University, Jan–June, 1983 (visiting professor)

University of Iowa, April 1988

University of Heidelberg, April–August, 1993 (visiting professor)

Chinese University of Hong Kong, September ,1996–August, 1998 (professor; Department Chair, 1997–98).

National Chengchi University, Taiwan, February–July, 2002.

 

(f) Other

 

  1. SCHOLARLY AND PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES

 

(a) Areas of special interest and accomplishments

 

Chinese popular thought, religion and culture. Popular religious sects of the late traditional and modern periods and their texts, and local rituals and beliefs practiced in villages. There are three larger intellectual concerns in my research:

  1. To come to a deeper understanding of traditional Chinese culture through approaching it from the popular level.
  2. To understand the historical development of Chinese religions, their interactions, beliefs and practices.
  3. To discuss Chinese religious phenomena in the context of world religious history.

 

(b) Research or equivalent grants (indicate under COMP whether grants were obtained competitively (C)
or non-competitively (NC))
Granting
Agency

Subject

COMP
$Per Year
Year
Principal
Investigator
Co-Investigator(s)
Canada Council travel and living
expenses during leave
C 4,150.00 1978–79
National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship for Independent Study and Research
(leave fellowship)
C salary replace-ment 1978–79
Canada Council Leave Fellowship C 1978–79 (declined)
UBC Humanities and Social Sciences Grant “Chinese Popular Religious Texts” C 914.00 1978–79
for purchase of microfilm reader C 1980–81
Grant for research in China, Committee on Scholarly Communi-cation with the People’s Republic of China, U.S. National Academy of Sciences I spent about five months in China doing research on popular religious literature in libraries and private collections. I worked in Beijing, Nanjing, Suzhou, and Shanghai. C all travel, residence and research expenses April-September, 1981
National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship for Independent Study and Research C 1985–86 (declined)
Wang Institute of Graduate Studies Research Leave Fellowship C salary replace-ment 1985
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Leave Fellowship C 5,015.00 1986
UBC Humanities and Social Sciences Research Grants C 1,800.00 1988–89
C 2,500.00 1991
C 1,500.00 1991
C 3,615.00 1990–92
C 200.00 1994
UBC Emergency Research Fund Grant C 970.00 1989–90
UBC-HSS Travel Grant C 2,000.00 1991
Kameyama Fund in Buddhist Studies NC 3,816.00 1996
Chinese University of Hong Kong Chinese Popular Religion in Late Traditional Times (Preparation for a book with this title) C 10,140.00 1997
Kameyama Fund in Buddhist Studies Chinese Popular Religion in Late Traditional Times NC 14,000.00 1998
Kameyama Fund Chinese Popular Religion in Late Traditional Times NC 3,000.00 1999
UBC HSS (Large Grants) Chinese Popular Religion in Late Traditional Times C 2,000.00 1999
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, Canada Temple Festivals in Rural North China C 37,276.00 2000–04
Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation (same subject) C 39,500.00
U.S.$
2000–04


(d) Conference Participation (Organizer, Keynote Speaker, etc.)

  1. In March, 1973, I served as coordinator and principal organizer of the “Oberlin Conference on Popular Religious Movements.” This conference consisted of eight papers by different U.S. specialists on such movements across the world, including China, India, the Philippines, Africa, North America, the Caribbean and medieval Europe. The conference was offered to students as a course for one hour of credit.
  2. Panels organized: I took the initiative in organizing a total of six panels on current research in Chinese religions at the following annual meetings of the American Academy of Religion: 1974, 1975, 1976 (two sessions each, 1974 and 1976), 1980. I helped organize the panel of papers and business meetings of the Society for the Study of Chinese Religions, held in conjunction with the AAS in March, 1976. Further assisted with SSCR panels through the spring of 1978. Resumed this task, 1982–1986.
  3. Initiated and chaired the U.B.C. China Seminar, 1980–84, 1990–91, in cooperation with the U.B.C. Institute of Asian Research.
  4. In August 1981, I was a conference discussant for a conference on “Orthodoxy and Heterodoxy in Late Imperial China,” in Montecito, CA, co-sponsored by the N.E.H. and the A.C.L.S.
  5. Conference discussant, symposium on Chinese civilization, “China’s Gifts to the World,” Memphis State University, October, 1984 (co-sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities).
  6. Discussant, Symposium on Religion and Society in China, University of Illinois, October, 1988.
  7. Organized and chaired a panel on “Chinese Religions: the State of the Field” at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies in 1992.
  8. SERVICE TO THE UNIVERSITY

(a) Memberships on committees, including offices held and dates

  1. Acting Head, Department of Religious Studies, January 1984-June 1985.
  2. Head, Department of Asian Studies, 1986–1991.
  3. Member, Advisory Committee on Non-Credit Continuing Education Programs.
  4. Member, U.B.C. Executive Committee for Research.
  5. Chair, Committee to Review the Department of Classics.
  6. Chair, Centre for Chinese Research, Institute of Asian Research, 1991–1992.
  7. Faculty Member, Green College, 1995–1996, 2002–2003.
  8. Member, Planning Committee for St. John’s College, 1995–1996.
  9. Member, President’s Senior Appointments Committee, 1995–1996.
  10. Member, President’s Advisory Commitee to select a new Head for the Department of Anthropology and Sociology, 1996.
  11. Member, President’s Advisory Committee to select a new Head for the Department of Asian Studies, 1996.
  12. Member, Promotion and Tenure Committee, Faculty of Arts, 1998–1999.
  13. Member, Graduate Committee, Dept. of Asian Studies.
  14. Faculty Fellow, St. John’s College, 2002–2005.

 

(b) Other service, including dates

+

 

  1. In 1973 I was the director of the “Oberlin in Taiwan” program. This involved planning the program and taking a group of ten students from U.S. colleges and universities to Taiwan in the summer for language study.
  2. At Princeton University, January–June, 1983: Virginia and Richard Stewart Lecturer, Senior Fellow in the Council of Humanities, and Visiting Professor in the Department of Religion.
  3. Three lectures at the University of Iowa, Aprll, 1988.
  4. Member, Fellowship Selection Committee, Chinese Popular Culture Project, U. of California, Berkeley, February, 1988.
  5. Teaching and research at the University of Heidelberg, Germany, April-July, 1993.
  6. Acting Chair, Department of Religion, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, 1997–98. Member of the University Senate at that time.
  7. At Hong Kong Baptist University, September 29- October 12, 2007 I gave a seminar and lecture in the Department of Religion and Philosophy, and consulted with individual faculty members about their work. I also evaluated Associate Professor Chan Shun Hing for substantiation ( tenure), which he obtained.

 

(b) Other service, including dates (cont.)

Work done at Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio, 1970–73:

Courses taught: Introduction to World Religions, Buddhism in India and Southeast Asia, Religions of Central and East Asia (China, Tibet, Japan), Seminar in Tribal (Primitive) Religions, Seminar in Psychology and Religion (co-instructor with a member of the Psychology Department), Civilizations of China and Japan (team-taught course).

Service to the college community: Chairman, Student Life Committee (Faculty Committee); Member, Governance Commission; Member, College Investment Advisory Committee; Trustee, Shansi Association (a foundation which provides funds for sending Oberlin students and faculty to Asia).

 

 

  1. SERVICE TO THE COMMUNITY

(a) Memberships on scholarly societies, including offices held and dates

Association for Asian Studies (AAS)

American Society for the Study of Religion.

Society for the Study of Chinese Religions, Secretary-Treasurer, 1975–78. (This society is formally affiliated with the AAS and AAR). Resigned in 1978 due to leave of absence. Elected to the SSCR Executive Committee in 1978 for a two-year term. Re-elected Secretary/Treasurer, 1982–85; editor of SSCR Newsletter. Elected President, 1985–88. Elected to Executive Board of Directors, 1998.

Joseph Levenson Book Prize, Pre-Twentieth Century Nominating Committee (AAS), Member, 1988–1989, Chair, 1990–91.

Member, China and Inner Asia Council (CIAC), Association for Asian Studies, 1990–93. Vice-chair, 1991–93.

Royal Society of Canada

Member, Advisory Board, Daoist Research Centre, Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2006 ff

Member, Advisory Board, book series on Local Society and Religion in China, 2007ff

 

(b) Memberships on other societies, including offices held and dates

 

(c) Memberships on scholarly committees, including offices held and dates

 

(d) Memberships on other committees, including offices held and dates

 

(e) Editorships (list journal and dates)

  1. I was the founding editor of the Bulletin of the Society for the Study of Chinese Religions, 1976–78. Edited five issues in that time. Resigned due to leave of absence. This is now the Journal of Chinese Religions, published annually at Indiana University.
  2. Editorial Board, China Review International, Journal of Chinese Religions, Contemporary Chinese Studies Series (UBC Press), Ching Feng, Min-su ch’ü-i: (A journal of Chinese local ritual and drama).

(f) Reviewer (journal, agency, etc. including dates)

  1. I have reviewed a number of book and article manuscripts for the Journal of Asian Studies, the Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies, Modern China, the Journal of Canadian History, History of Religions, Pacific Affairs, Comparative Studies in Society and History, Journal of Chinese Religions, The American Sociological Review ,the China Quarterly, the Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences, and the University Presses of British Columbia, California, Chicago, Hawaii, New York (SUNY), Princeton, Michigan, Stanford, and Washington. I am a research proposal evaluator in Chinese religions for the ACLS, NEH, CSCPRC, SSHRCC and FCAR (Québec).

 

(g) External examiner (indicate universities and dates)

 

  1. External reviewer, Dept. of Religious Studies, McMaster University, Jan., 1985.
  2. External reviewer for the Graduate Program in Religious Studies, University of Toronto, October, 1990.
  3. External reviewer for tenure and promotion decisions at the University of Illinois, University of Alberta, and at Washington University, St. Louis, MO. External reviewer for a proposed new Ph.D. in comparative religion at Western Michigan University.

(g) External examiner (indicate universities and dates) (cont.)

 

  1. External reviewer for tenure and promotion decisions at Princeton University, Harvard University, Yale University, McGill University, the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Oregon, and the University of Colorado, Indiana University, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, the Chinese University of Hong Kong, the University of Calgary, Hong Kong Baptist University, University of Malaya and National Singapore University.
  2. Served as an external reviewer for the appointment of a “University Professor” at the University of Toronto, 1993.
  3. External Assessor, Department of Chinese Studies, Universiti Malaya.

 

(h) Consultant (indicate organization and dates)

 

(i) Other service to the community

 

  1. Board of Directors, Endowment Lands Regional Park Committee, 1984–1990.
  2. Co-Chairman, Endowment Lands Regional Park Committee, 1987–90.
  3. China Workshop Leader, Kamloops School District Teachers Professional Day, 1987.
  4. Led a China tour, May, 1988, sponsored by the UBC Centre for Continuing Education.
  5. Contributed to two “Ideas” programs on CBC radio, 1992 and 1994.
  6. Volunteer for the Western Canada Wilderness Committee.
  7. Policy Chair, Point Grey Riding Committee, B.C. Liberal Party, 2001–2005.
  8. Elected to Board of Directors, Nature Vancouver (Vancouver Natural History Society), Spring, 2008ff
  9. Garibaldi Award for Outstanding Service, Nature Vancouver, 2010

 

 

  1. AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

 

(a) Awards for Teaching (indicate name of award, awarding organizations, date)

 

UBC Killam Faculty Teaching Prize, 2000, $5,000.00

 

(b) Awards for Scholarship (indicate name of award, awarding organizations, date)

Book, Folk Buddhist Religion, given a prize by the American Council of Learned Societies, History of Religions Committee, as “the best first book written by an historian of religions in the last three years. Letter of notification dated March 15, 1979. (Please see the attached “Publications Record” for information on this book.)

UBC Killam Faculty Research Prize, $20,000.00, 1986.

Elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, 1988.

Listed in Who’s Who in the World, Who’s Who in America, Who’s Who in the West,
and Canadian Who’s Who.

University of Chicago, Divinity School, “Alumnus of the Year”, 2001.

Appointed Distinguished Associate Member of the UBC Centre for Chinese Research, October, 2002.

 

(c) Awards for Service (indicate name of award, awarding organizations, date)

UBC Quarter Century Club, 1998.

 

(d) Other Awards

  1. OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION (Maximum 0ne Page)

I was a member of the supervisory committees for three Ph.D. students in traditional Chinese literature working with Prof. J.D. Schmidt, for a Ph.D. student in Comparative Literature, and for two students working with Professor Donald Baker on Korean religions.

On September 14–15, 2002, my graduate students past and present organized an international conference in my honor with 22 papers presented by scholars from France, China, Taiwan, Malaysia, Canada and the U.S.

Religious Thought and Lived Religion in China:
A Conference in Honour of Prof. Daniel L. Overmyer on his Retirement.

This conference has resulted in a book, edited by Philip Clart and Paul Crowe, The People and the Dao: New Studies of Chinese Religions in Honour of Daniel L. Overmyer, Sankt Augustin, Germany, Institut Monumenta Serica, 2009. Monumenta Serica Monograph Series LX.

 

 

 

 

THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

Publications Record

 

SURNAME: OVERMYER FIRST NAME: Daniel
Initials:

MIDDLE NAME(S): Date: April 30, 2007

  1. BOOKS

R* Folk Buddhist Religion: Dissenting Sects in Late Traditional China. 259 pp. plus glossary, bibliography and index. Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press, June, 1976. Harvard East Asian Series, #83.

R* The Flying Phoenix: Aspects of Chinese Sectarianism in Taiwan, by David K. Jordan and Daniel L. Overmyer. Princeton, Princeton University Press, 1986. 329 pages.

R* Religions of China: The World as a Living System. San Francisco, Harper & Row, Publishers, March, 1986. This is an introductory textbook in a series intended for first year university students, “Religious Traditions of the World”. 125 pages. This was reprinted with its nine co-volumes in a single volume edited by Byron H. Earhart, Religious Traditions of the World, also by Harper, 1992.

R* A Chinese translation of Folk Buddhist Religion: Dissenting Sects in Late Traditional China. by Zhou Yumin and others (Dept. of History at the Shanghai Normal University), Zhong-guo min-jian zong-jiao jiao-pai yan-jiu [A study of Chinese folk-religious sects]. Shanghai, Chinese Classics Publishing House, 1993.

R* Precious Volumes: An Introduction to Chinese Sectarian Scriptures from the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries, Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Asia Center, 1999. 444 pages. Harvard-Yenching Monograph Series, 49.

  1. Baojuan, Shiliu zhi shiqi shiji Zhongguo zongjiao jingzhuan daolun. Ma Rong, translator, National Committee for Qing History, Beijing, Central Compilation and Translation Press, 2004. (Trans.of Precious Volumes book)

R* Fei Luan. A Chinese translation of the Flying Phoenix book, translated by Zhou Yumin, edited by Sung Kuang-yu. Hong Kong : Chinese University of Hong Kong Press, 2005.

R* Ethnography in China Today: A Critical Assessment of Methods and Results. Edited, wrote the Introduction and one chapter. Taipei, Taiwan, Yuan-liou Publishing Co. Ltd., 2002.

R* Interpretations of Hope in Chinese Religions and Christianity, co-edited with Lai Chi Tim. Wrote one chapter. Hong Kong, 2005.

R* The China Quarterly Special Issue: Religion in China Today, (No.174, June 2003). Edited and wrote the introduction. (This was also published as the book Religion in China Today, less the book reviews).

R* Religion in China Today, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2003. Edited and wrote the introduction.

R* A Japanese translation of the 1976 Folk Buddhist Religion book, Chogoku minkan Bukkyo kyoha no kenkyu, translated by Rimbara Fumiko and Ito Michiharu. Tokyo, Kenbun shuppan, 2005.

Edited an wrote Introductions and English Language summaries of fifty-six reports by Chinese local scholars in Hebei Province for the

  1. Baozhuan, Shiliu shiji zhi shiqi shiji Zhongguo zongjiao jingzhuan daolun, trans. Ma Rong, edited Zhen Xumi. The Chinese Society for the Study of Qing History, 2004. ( A Chinese Translation of Precious Volumes, 1999.)

 

Series: Huabei nongcun minjian wenhua yanjiu (Collection of studies of popular culture in north China villages), co-edited with Fan Lizhu and others, Tianjin: Tianjin guji chubanshe, 2006-2007. The four volumes of this series have now been published, in 1543 pages. (Reports of local religious culture in Hebei Province written by local scholars; I wrote English summaries of all the articles, assisted in some cases by Roberto Ong.

 

  1. Local Religion in North China in the Twentieth Century: The Structure and Organization of Community Rituals and Beliefs. Leiden, Brill, 2009.
  2. Zhongguo beifang nongcunshehui de minjianxinyang. Fan Lizhu and Ou Danian, Shanghai, Renmin chubanshe, 2012. (A Chinese translation of my Local Religion in North China, above)
  3. Asian Religions in British Columbia, co-edited with Don Baker and Larry DeVries. A book of twelve reports by B.C. local scholars. Vancouver, B.C., University of British Columbia Press, 2010.
  4. “ Special Issue, Women in Chinese Religions”, Min-su ch’u-i (Journal of Chinese Ritual, Theatre and Folklore), No. 168, June 2010, edited and wrote the Introduction.

.

 

  1. REFEREED PUBLICATIONS

(a) Journal articles and book chapters

* “Folk-Buddhist Religion: Creation and Eschatology in Medieval China,” History of Religions, 12.1: 42-70 (August 1972).

* Boatmen and Buddhas: The Lo chiao in Ming Dynasty China.” History of Religions, 17.3-4: 284-302, (February–May 1978).

* “Dualism and Conflict in Chinese Popular Religion.” Frank E. Reynolds and Theodore Ludwig, eds., Transitions and Transformations in the History of Religions: Supplements to Numen Series, Leiden: E.J. Brill, 1980, pp. 153–184.

 

Four articles for the Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions (Nashville, Tenn., 1981): “Chinese Popular Religion” (3000 words). “Feng-shui” (500 words). “Household Gods” (500 words). “White Lotus Society” (250 words), pp. 164-168, 257-258-329 and 804.

* “Alternatives: Popular Religious Sects in Chinese Society,” Modern China 7:2: 153-190, (April 1981).

* “The White Cloud Sect in Sung and Yüan China,” Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies, 42:2: 615-642, (December 1982).

* “Attitudes Toward the Ruler and State in Chinese Popular Religious Literature; Sixteenth and Seventeenth Century Pao-chüan,” Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies, 44:2: 347–379, (December 1984).

* “Values in Chinese Sectarian Literature: Ming and Ch’ing Pao-chüan,”Popular Culture in Late Imperial China: Diversity and Integration, edited by David Johnson, Andrew J. Nathan and Evelyn S. Rawski. Berkeley, U. of California Press, 1985, pp. 219–254.

* “Chinese Religions: A Historical Overview,” in The Encyclopedia of Religion. New York, Macmillan Publishing Co., 1987, 3:257–289. (This article was reprinted in a volume of selections from the Encyclopedia edited by Joseph M. Kitagawa, entitled The Religous Traditions of Asia, New York, Macmillan, 1989).

* Messenger, Saviour and Revolutionary: Roles of Maitreya in Chinese Popular Religious Literature.” In Helen Hardacre and Alan Sponberg, editors, Maitreya, The Future Buddha, New York, Cambridge University Press, 1988, pp.110–134.

* “Buddhism in the Trenches: Attitudes Toward Popular Religion in Chinese Scriptures found at Tun-huang,” in Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies, 50.1:197-222 (June 1990).

* “Attitudes Toward Popular Religion in Ritual Texts of the Chinese State: The Collected Statutes of the Great Ming.” Cahiers d’Extrême-Asie, (Publication of Section de Kyoto, École Française d’Extrême Orient), 5:191-221 (1990).

“Glowing Coals: The first twenty-five years of the Department of Asian Studies at the University of British Columbia, 1960–1985,” in B.C. Asian Review, 3–4: 1-27 (1990).

* “Women in Chinese Religions: Submission, Struggle, Transcendence.” In Gregory Schopen and Koichi Shinohara, eds., From Benares to Beijing: Essays on Buddhism and Chinese Religions in Honour of Prof. Jan Yun-hua, Oakville, Ontario, Mosaic Press , 1991, pp 91-120.

* Co-authored with Thomas S.Y. Li, “The Oldest Chinese Sectarian Scripture, The Precious Volume Expounded by the Buddha, on the Results of [the teaching of] the Imperial Ultimate Period.” Journal of Chinese Religions, 20: 17-31 (1992).

* “Chinese Religions: the State of the Field,” Parts I and II, Journal of Asian Studies, 54, no. 1 (February 1995): 124-160, and 54, no. 2 (May 1995): 314-395 (with ten co-authors, originated, edited and with introductions by D.L. Overmyer).

* Review article on “Proceedings of [the] International Conference on Popular Beliefs and Chinese Culture”, (Center for Chinese Studies, Taipei,. Taiwan, R.O.C., April, 1994), Journal of Chinese Religions, 23: 147–155 (Fall 1995).

* “Chinese Religions as Part of the History of Salvation: a Dialogue with Christianity”, Ching Feng, 40:1.1–14, March 1997.

* “Convergence: Chinese Gods and Christian Saints,” Ching Feng 40:3–4.215–232 (September–December, 1997).

* “Social Perspectives in Chinese Sectarian Scriptures from the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries” to be published in Civil Society in East Asia: History, Concepts, Institution. Proceedings of the Vth Symposium of the North American-European Joint Committee for Cooperation in East Asian Studies, edited by Charles Le Blanc and Alain Rocher, 1998, pp. 7–35.

* Review article on Poo Mu-chou, In Search of Personal Welfare: a View of Ancient Chinese Religion (Albany, State University of New York Press, 1998). Journal of Chinese Religions 26: 172–176 (1998).

* “Quan-zhen Daoist Influence on Sectarian “Precious Volumes” from the Seventeenth Century.” Daojiao yu Minjian Zongjiao Yanjiu Lunji (Research articles on Daoism and [Chinese] popular religion), edited by Lai Chi Tim. Hong Kong, Xuefang Wenhua shiye Co., 1999, pp. 73–93.

(a) Journals (cont.)

 

* Book Chapter: “On the Foundations of Chinese Culture in Late Traditional Times: Comments on Fang Xuejia, ed., Meizhou diqu de miaohui yu zongzu (The lineages and temple festivals of the Meizhou area) and his Meizhou Heyuan diqu de cunluo wenhua (Village religion & culture).” In Ethnography in China Today: A Critical Assessment of Methods and Results, edited by D.L. Overmyer. 2002, pp. 313–342.

* “From ‘Feudal Superstition’ to ‘Popular Beliefs’: New Directions in Mainland Chinese Studies of Chinese Popular Religion,” Cahiers d’Extrême Asie, 12: 105–128 (2001).

* “Introduction” to The China Quarterly 174 (June 2003), Special Issue on Religion in China Today.

* “Shenming, shengtu, lingmei he raojing: cong Zhongguo wenhua guandian bijiao difang minjian xinyang chuantong” (Gods, saints, spirit-mediums and processions: comparing local religious traditions from the point of view of Chinese culture) Taiwan Journal of Religious Studies 2:2.1–16 (June 2003).

“Lishi, wenxian he shidi diaocha—yanjiu Zhongguo zongjiao de zonghe fangfa”, (History, texts and fieldwork—a combined method for the study of Chinese religions), in Journal of History and Anthropology 2:1.197–205 (April 2004).

* “Ritual Leaders in North China Local Communities in the Twentieth Century: A Report on Research in Progress”, Min-su ch’u-I (Journal of Chinese Ritual, Theatre and Folklore) 153:203-263 (2006.9)

 

* “Chinese Religious Traditions from 1900-2005: an Overview”, pp. 173-197 in The Cambridge Companion to Modern Chinese Culture, Edited by Kam Louie, Cambridge University Press, 2008.

 

  1. NON-REFEREED PUBLICATIONS

 

(a) Journals

 

“The Chinese Reformation” (Sectarian background of Maoism), The Seminary Review, Spring 1970,
pp. 3–16.

“Acceptance in Context: Death and Traditional China.” Fred H. Holck, ed., Death and Eastern Thought, Nashville, Abingdon Press, 1974, pp. 198–225.

“A Preliminary Study of the Tz’u-hui t’ang, a Contemporary Religious Sect on Taiwan,” Society for the Study of Chinese Religions Bulletin, 4: 19-40, (October 1977).

Shih-shuo hsin-yü: A New Account of Tales of the World, by Liu I-ch’ing with commentary by Liu Chun. Translated with introduction and notes by Richard B. Mather. Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press, 1976, in History of Religions, 17.2: 194-20, (November 1977), (review article).

“Chinese Studies: Some Contributions to the Humanities”, U.B.C. Artsnews February, 1995. (A Chinese translation of this was published in Zhongguo yanjiu , May, 1995).

“Taiwan Tz’u-hui t’ang te k’ao-ch’a”, Min-chien tsung-chiao 1:83-91 (1995) (This is a translation by Zhou Yumin of a chapter from my book The Flying Phoenix, co-authored with David Jordan).

“Gods, saints, shamans and processions: comparative religion from the bottom up”, in Criterion 41.3:2–9, 34.

 

“The World as a Holy Place”, TREK, The Magazine of the University of British Columbia, Vol. 12, Summer 2005, pp.14-17. Also published in Humanist Perspectives 157:20-22 (Summer 2006), and Anpere.net Newsletter ( April 2007, an online journal of anthropological perspectives on religion).

 

(b) Conference Proceedings

 

(c) Other

 

Book reviews to 2000; continued to publish reviews after this date but have not included them here. (Review articles are listed above).

“Undisturbed Narration,” a review of D.H. Smith, Chinese Religions. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1968. History of Religions, Vol. 9, Nos. 2 and 3, November 1969/February 1970, pp. 256–260.

Chesneaux, Jean, ed., Popular Movements and Secret Societies in China. Stanford, 1972. The American Political Science Review, 68.4: 1795-1797 (1974).

Religious Studies Review, Vol. 2, No. 1, January 1976, pp. 32–33.

Ahern, Emily M., The Cult of the Dead in a Chinese Village. Stanford, Stanford University Press, 1973.

Book reviews to 2000: (cont.)

Jordan, David K., Gods, Ghosts and Ancestors: The Folk Religion of a Taiwanese Village. Berkeley, University of California Press, 1972.

Wolf, Arthur P., ed., Religion and Ritual in Chinese Society. Stanford, Stanford University Press, 1974,
Vol. 2, No. 4, October 1976, p. 38:

Bodde, Derk, Festivals in Classical China: New Year and other Annual Observances during the Han Dynasty 206 B.C.–A.D. 220. Princeton, N.J., Princeton University Press, 1975.

(Note: the above four items are short book notes in the Religious Studies Review)

“Exorcism and Renewal in Ancient China,” a review of Derk Bodde, Festivals in Classical China: New Year and other Annual Observances during the Han Dynasty 206 B.C.–A.D. 220. Princeton, N.J., Princeton University Press, 1975, History of Religions 17:1: 86-89 (August 1977).

Granet, Marcel, The Religion of the Chinese People, tr. Maurice Freedman, New York, Harper and Row, 1975, Journal of Asian Studies, 37.1: 107-108 (November 1977).

Hsu, Sung-peng, A Buddhist Leader in Ming China: The Life and Thought of Han-shan Te-ch’ing. University Park, The Pennsylvania State University Press, 1979. Journal of Asian Studies, May 1980, pp. 548–550.

Berling, Judith A., The Syncretic Religion of Lin Chao-en. New York, Columbia University Press, 1980. Journal of Asian Studies, XLI.1: 95–96 (November 1981 ).

Saso, Michael and David Chappell, eds., Buddhist and Taoist Studies, I. Honolulu, University Press of Hawaii, 1977. Journal of the American Oriental Society, 100.1: 89-30 (1980).

Amore, Roy C., ed., Developments in Buddhist Thought: Canadian Contributions to Buddhist Studies. Waterloo, Ontario, Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 1974. Philosophy East and West, July 1981, pp. 383–385.

Yü, Anthony C., ed. and trans., The Journey to the West, Vol. I. Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 1977. The Christian Century, October 19, 1977, pp . 958–960 .

Eliade, Mircea, Autobiography, Volume 1: 1907-1937, Journey East, JourneyWest, translated by MacLinscott Ricketts. San Francisco, Harper and Row Publishers, 1981. The Christian Century, April 14, 1982, pp. 453–454.

Naquin, Susan, Shantung Rebellion: The Wang Lun Uprising of 1774. New Haven, Yale University Press, 1981. The China Quarterly, 1982.

Chan, Hok-lam and Wm. Theodore de Bary, eds., Yuan Thought: Chinese Thought and Religion Under the Mongols. New York, Columbia University Press, 1982. Ming Studies, 1984.

Smith, Richard J., China‘s Cultural Heritage: The Ch’ing Dynasty, 1644–1912. Boulder, Westview Press, 1983. Ming Studies, Spring 1985.

Henderson, John B., The Development and Decline of Chinese Cosmology. New York, Columbia University Press, 1984. The American Historical Review, December 1985.

Gimello, Robert M. and Peter N. Gregory, eds., Studies in Ch’an and Hua-yen. Honolulu, University of Hawaii Press, 1983. Journal of Asian Studies, May 1985.

Paul, Diana Y. Women in Buddhism: Images of the Feminine in the Mahayana Tradition, 2nd edition. Berkeley, University of California Press, 1985. Journal of Asian Studies, May 1986.

De Vos, George A. and Takao Sofue, eds., Religion and the Family in East Asia. Berkeley, CA, U. of California Press, 1986. Journal of Asian Studies, February, 1988.

Weinstein, Stanley, Buddhism Under the T’ang. New York, Cambridge University Press, 1987. American Historical Review, June, 1988.

Huang Tsung-hsi, Records of Ming Scholars. A Selected Translation. Ed. Julia Ching. Honolulu, University of Hawaii Press, 1987. Journal of the American Academy of Religion, 1988

Yü Song-qing, Ming Qing Bai-lien jiao yan-chiu (A study of Ming and Qing White Lotus sects), Chengdu, Sichuan ren-min chu-banshe, 1987. Cahiers d’Extrême-Asie, 1988.

Larson, Gerald James and Eliot Deutsch, eds., Interpreting Across Boundaries: New Essays in Com­parative Philosophy. Princeton, Princeton University Press, 1988. Journal of Asian Studies, August, 1989.

Book reviews to 2000: (cont.)

Brook, Timothy, Geographical Sources of Ming-Qing History. Ann Arbor, Center for Chinese Studies, U. of Michigan, 1988. Canadian Journal of History, August, 1989.

Rubenstein, Murray A., The Protestant Community on Modern Taiwan: Mission, Seminary and Church. New York and London, M.E. Sharpe, 1991. Journal of Asian Studies 51.1: 156–158 (February 1992).

ter Haar, B.J., The White Lotus Teachings in Chinese Religious History. Leiden, E.J. Brill, 1922. Journal of Asian Studies 51.4: 908-909 (November 1992).

Tong, James W., Disorder under Heaven: Collective Violence in the Ming Dynasty. Stanford, Stanford University Press, 1991. Canadian Journal of History XXVII: 586-587 (December 1992)

Robinet, Isabelle. Taoist Meditation: The Mao-shan Tradition of Great Purity, (New York: SUNY Press, 1993). Studies in Religion.

Brook, Timothy. Praying for Power: Buddhism and the Formation of Gentry Society in Late Ming China (Cambridge, MA, 1993). Canadian Journal of History XXIX; 609-611 (December 1994).

Murray, Dian H., with Qin Baoqi. The Origins of the Tiandihui: The Chinese Triads in Legend and History (Stanford, CA, 1994). Journal of the American Oriental Society, 115.4 (1995).

Ching, Julia. Chinese Religions (Mary Knoll, 1993). China Review International, 2.2: 418-420 (Fall 1995).

Robinet, Isabelle. Taoism: Growth of a Religion. Translated by Phyllis Brooks (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1997). China Review International 5:2.219–221 (Fall 1998).

McLaren, Anne E. Chinese Popular Culture and Ming Chantefables (Leiden, E.J. Brill, 1998). Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies, Vol. 59, No. 2, 1999. Pp. 629–637.

Reviews in Pacific Affairs :

DeBary, Wm. Theodore, ed., The Unfolding of Neo-Confucianism, New York, Columbia University Press, 1975, Vol. 49, No. 1: 120–122 (Spring 1976).

Pokora, Timoteus, tr., Hsin-lun (New Treatise) and Other Writings by Huan T’an (43 B.C.–28 A.D., Ann Arbor: Center for Chinese Studies, University of Michigan, 1975, Vol. 49, No. 1: 179–180 (Spring 1976).

Tu Wei-ming, Centrality and Commonality. An Essay on Chung-yung, Honolulu, University Press of Hawaii, 1976, Vol. 50.1:130-131 (Spring 1977).

Tu Wei-ming, Neo-Confucian thought in Action: Wang Yang-ming’s Youth, Berkeley, University of California Press, 1976, Vol. 50, No. 2 (Summer 1977), pp. 300–301.

Posner, Arlene and Arne J. de Keijzer, eds., China: A Resource and Curriculum Guide (second edition, revised). Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 1976, Vol. 49, No. 4 (Winter 1976–77), pp. 752–753.

Naquin, Susan, Millenarian Rebellion in China: The Eight Trigrams Uprising of 1813. New Haven, Yale University Press, 1976, Vol. 51, No. 1 (Spring 1978), pp. 112–113.

Metzger, Thomas A., Escape from Predicament: Neo-Confucianism and China’s Evolving Political Culture. New York, Columbia University Press, 1977, 50.4: 686-687 (Winter 1977–78).

Liu Ts’un-yan, Selected Papers from the Hall of Harmonious Wind. Leiden, E.J. Brill, 1977, 50.4: 699-700 (Winter 1977–78).

Welch, Holmes and Anna Seidel, eds., Facets of Taoism. New Haven, Yale University Press, 1979, 52.4: 722-724 (Winter 1979–80).

Maspero, Henri, Taoism and Chinese Religion. Translated by Frank A. Kierman, Jr., Amherst, The University of Massachusetts Press, 1981, 55.2: 284-286 (Summer 1982).

Hsiao Kung-chuan, A History of Chinese Political Thought, Volume I: From the Beginnings to the Sixth Cen­tury A.D. Translated by F.W. Mote, Princeton, Princeton University Press, 1979, 55.3: 477-479 (Fall 1982).

Handlin, Joanna F., Action in Late Ming Thought. The Re-orientation of Lu K’un and Other Scholar-Officials. Berkeley, University of California Press, 1983 (Fall 1984).

Mair, Victor H., Tun-huang Popular Narratives. London, Cambridge University Press, 1983 (Spring 1985).

Reviews in Pacific Affairs: (cont.)

Yu, David C., Guide to Chinese Religion. Boston, G.K. Hall and Co., 1985 (Spring 1986).

Munro, Donald, Ed., Individualism and Holism: Studies in Confucian and Taoist Values. Ann Arbor, U. of Michigan, Center for Chinese Studies, 1985 (1987).

Watson, James L. and Evelyn S. Rawski, eds., Death Ritual in Late Imperial and Modern China. Berkeley, University of California Press, 1988. (1989).

Kuhn, P.A. Soulstealers: The Chinese Sorcery Scare of 1768 (Cambridge MA, Harvard University Press. 64.4: 560–561.

Dean, Kenneth, Taoist Ritual and Popular Cults of Southeast China. Princeton, N.J. Princeton University Press, 1993. 67.2 (August 1994).

Hinsch, Brett. Passions of the Cut Sleeve: The Male Homosexual Tradition in China (Berkeley, 1990). Pacific Affairs 67.3: 483-484 (Fall 1994)

Chong, Ken Ray. Cannibalism in China (Wakefield, NH, 1990). Pacific Affairs 67.3: 483-484 (Fall 1994).

Gernet, Jacques. Buddhism in Chinese Society (New York, Columbia University Press, 1995) 64:4.596–597 (Winter 1995–1996).

Gedalecia, The Philosophy of W’u Ch’eng: A Neo-Confucian of the Yuan Dynasty. Bloomington (Indiana): Research Institute for Inner Asian Studies, Indiana University, 1999.

Hubbard, Jamie, Absolute Delusion, Perfect Buddhahood: The Rise and Fall of a Chinese Heresy, Honolulu, University of Hawaii Press, 2002. In Pacific Affairs.

  1. b) Conference presentations (= research papers given)

“The Wu-wei sect of the Ming Dynasty,” Northwest Regional Seminar on China, Western Washington State College, May 4, 1974. At the same seminar meeting I was also a discussant in a panel on “The Notion of Orthodoxy from Max Weber’s Religion of China.’

“The Tz’u-hui t’ang: A Contemporary Religious Sect on Taiwan,” Canadian Society for Asian Studies, annual meeting, June 2, 1974, University of Toronto. I read this same paper at a meeting of the Honors/Asian Studies Colloquium, University of Puget Sound, on October 18, 1974 (invited lecture). Published as part of my Flying Phoenix book.

“Ming Dynasty Popular Scriptures: An Introduction to the Pao-chüan of Lo Ch’ing and his Wu-wei chiao,” read at the meeting of the Society for the Study of Chinese Religions, held in conjunction with the Association for Asian Studies, Toronto, March 19, 1976, 22 typed pages (partly incorporated into the article “Values in Chinese Sectarian Literature”, published 1985).

“Unity and Diversity in Chinese Religion,” in a panel on “Elite and Folk Religions,” Northwest Regional Seminar on China, University of Washington, April 24, 1976. Oral presentation.

“Boatman and Buddhas: the Lo chiao in Ming Dynasty China,” 30 International Congress of Human Sciences in Asia and North Africa, Mexico City, August 7, 1976. Published.

“Chinese Religions; the State of the Art,” Regional Seminar, Center for Chinese Studies, University of California, Berkeley, Feb. 12, 1977.

“Dualism and Conflict in Chinese Popular Religion,” Annual meeting, Asian Studies on the Pacific Coast, Eugene, Oregon, June 18, 1977. Published.

Pao-chüan: Types and Transformations,” Annual meeting, Association for Asian Studies, Chicago, Illinois, March 31, 1978, 46 typed pages.

“The Sayings of Chairman Lü: Popular Religious Texts in Taiwan,” Harvard University, Conference on “High Culture and Popular Culture in East Asia,” August 24, 1978, 54 typed pages (mostly included in the book, The Flying Phoenix ).

“Values and Communication in Chinese Popular Culture: Some Suggestions for Discussion,” Planning meeting for a workshop on “Values and Communications in Chinese Popular Culture,” sponsored by the American Council of Learned Societies, Committee on Studies of Chinese Civilization, at Columbia University, New York, January 13, 1979. Oral presentation.

“Alternatives: Popular Religious Sects in Chinese Society,” Harvard, workshop on “Rebellion and Revolution in North China: Late Ming to the Present,” Harvard University, August, 1979. Published.

  1. b) Conference presentations (= research papers given) (cont.)

“The White Cloud Sect in Sung and Yüan China,” American Academy of Religion, annual meeting , Dallas, Texas, November, 1980. Published.

“Values in Chinese Sectarian Literature, Mid-Ming to the Twentieth Century,” Part I: Pao-chüan,” conference on “Values and Communication in Chinese Popular Culture,” sponsored by the ACLS and the East-West Center, University of Hawaii, January 2–6, 1981. I presented this paper earlier (in oral form only) at a meeting of the “East Asian Coffee Hour,” Princeton University, Princeton, N.J., November 5, 1980.

“Values in Chinese Sectarian Literature, Mid-Ming to the Present, Part II, Spirit-writing Texts,” Association for Asian Studies, Toronto, Ontario, March 14, 1981. (Panel sponsored by the Society for the Study of Chinese Religions.) Incorporated in book manuscript “The Flying Phoenix.”

“Values in Pao-chüan Literature,” conference on “China in the Seventeenth Century,” Moscow, USSR, June 15–18, 1982, co-sponsored by the Soviet Academy of Sciences and the American Council of Learned Societies. Oral presentation.

“Attitudes toward the Ruler and State in Chinese Popular Religious Literature: Sixteenth and Seventeenth Century Pao-chüan,” the Princeton Conference on Maitreya Studies, May 1–3, 1983. Published.

I also gave three lectures in China in 1981 (in Chinese):
“Methodology of the History of Religions,” Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Beijing.

“The White Cloud and White Lotus Schools of the Sung and Yüan Dynasties,” Department of History, Nanjing University.

“Ming and Ch’ing Popular Religious Sects,” Department of History, Nanjing University.

“Messenger, Saviour and Revolutionary: The Roles of Maitreya in Chinese Popular Religious Literature.” This paper presented at the University of Washington, University of Victoria, U.C.L.A., University of California, Berkeley and Davis, and the University of Heidelberg, 1983–1987. Published.

The Flying Phoenix: Aspects of Chinese Sectarianism in Taiwan. Lectures introducing this book given at the University of California, Berkeley (11/85) and Stanford University (1986).

“Conscious Innovation and New Revelation in Chinese Religions: Some Evidence from Taoism, Buddhism, and Popular Religion,” Society for the Study of Chinese Religions, Boston, AAS, 1987. (Also given at Oberlin College, 1987.)

“Cultural Integration in Late Imperial China: The Case of Popular Religion.” University of Iowa, April, 1988.

“Buddhism in the Trenches: Attitudes Toward Popular Religion in Chinese Indigenous Scriptures from Tun-huang.” Association for Asian Studies, March, 1988; Harvard University, April, 1988. Also presented at the International Conference on Chinese Folk Literature, Taipei, September, 1989. Published.

“Women in Chinese Religions: Submission, Struggle, Transcendence.” Symposium in conjunction with the exhibit “Views from Jade Terrace: Chinese Women Artists, 1300–1912,” Indianapolis Museum of Art, October, 1988. Published.

“Attitudes Toward Popular Religion in Ritual Texts of the Chinese State: The Collected Statutes of the Great Ming.” Conference sponsored by the Social Science Research Council on “Communities in Question: Religion and Authority in East and Southeast Asia,” Hua-hin, Thailand, May, 1989.

This paper was also presented at the 1989 Ohio State University College of Humanities Symposium, Columbus, Ohio, March, 1989. Published.

“The Role of Lo Ch’ing (1492–1527) in the Development of Sixteenth and Seventeenth Century Sectarian Scriptures,” Conference on “Rituals and Scriptures of Chinese Popular Religion,” Bodega Bay, CA, January, 1990.

This paper was also presented at the April 1990 annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies in Chicago.

“The Oldest Chinese Sectarian Scripture”. UBC Institute of Asian Research, China/Korea Seminar, February 25, 1992. Published.

“Social Perspectives in Chinese Sectarian Scriptures from the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries,” Symposium on “Civil Society in East Asian Countries,” Joint Committee for European-North American Cooperation in East Asian Studies, meeting at the University of Montreal, October, 1992. This paper also presented at the University of Heidelberg and at Oxford University in the summer of 1993. Published.

“Why Study Religion” and “Chinese Popular Religion,” Dept. of History, Zhongshan University, Guangzhou, China, May, 1997.

  1. b) Conference presentations (= research papers given) (cont.)

Papers and invited lectures: “The order and inner logic of Chinese popular religion”; presented at the Chinese University on March 10, 1998; also presented at the Academia Sinica in Taiwan in May and at Shanghai Normal University in June, 1998 and at St. John’s College, UBC, October 7, 1998.

Review report on the book Meizhou Heyuan diqu de cunluo wenhau (The village culture of the Heyuan area of Meizhou, Guangdong province), 1997, conference on “Ethnography in China Today”, Chinese University of Hong Kong, May 14–16, 1998.

“History, texts and fieldwork: a combined approach to the study of Chinese religions”, presented at a conference on “Problems and methods in the study of religion”, Taiwan, July, 1998. This conference was co-sponsored by the National Chengchi University and the Academia Sinica.

“Current Chinese studies of Chinese popular religion: a review report,” annual meeting, Society for the Study of Chinese Religions, Association of Asian Studies, Boston, March 13, 1999.

Three lectures on Chinese popular religion and popular religious texts, Luminary Buddhist Institute, Chia-yi, Taiwan, June, 1999. (This is a training centre for nuns).

“The order and inner logic of Chinese popular religion” (modified version of that listed above; in Chinese), International Conference of Religious Studies: Meeting the Millennium, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. December 30, 1999–January 1, 2000. This paper was also presented in China at Nankai University in Tianjin and Fudan University in Shanghai in 2000 and 2001 (in Chinese).

“From ‘Feudal Superstition’ to ‘Popular Beliefs’; New Directions in Chinese Studies of Chinese Popular Religion,” Regional China Colloquium, Simon Fraser University, Harbour Centre, March 4, 2000 (a draft version of the lecture given in Hong Kong in May, 2000 (see below)).

“Why study religion: an academic and personal discussion, with illustrations from Chinese religion and philosophy,” Inaugural Lecture in Religion and Mythology, Langara College, March 14, 2000.

“From ‘Feudal Superstition’ to ‘Popular Beliefs’; New Directions in Chinese Studies of Chinese Popular Religion,” International Conference on Religion and Chinese Society: The Transformation of a Field and Its Implications for the Study of Chinese Culture,” Chinese University of Hong Kong, May 29–June 2, 2000. Published.

“Ethnography in China Today: A Critical Assessment of Methods and Results; A Report on the conference volume (in Chinese). Conference on [Chinese] Ritual, Theatre and Folklore, National Tsing-hua University, Taiwan, June 5–7, 2000. Book published.

Discussant, panel on “Anthropology: Beliefs and Life,” Third International Conference on Sinology, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, June 29–July 1, 2000.

“The role and function of Daoist priests and rituals in Chinese popular religion, with illustrations from Fujian, Hong Kong, and Jiangxi,” inaugural lecture in a series on Daoism, Department of History, Nankai University, Tianjin, China, July 10, 2000 (in Chinese). Accepted for publication.

“Struggle, Auspicious Times and the Potential for Moral Transformation: The Popular Religious Context of Chinese Sectarian Beliefs about the Destruction and Renewal of the World.” Conference on Chinese Millenialism in Comparative Perspective, Harvard University, April 27–29, 2002.

“Gods, Saints, Shamans and Processions: Comparative Religion from the Bottom Up.” Public lecture, Divinity School. University of Chicago, May 2, 2002 (Lecture given as part of a ceremony in which I received an award for “Alumnus of the Year”) (Published).

“Temple Festivals in Rural North China,” Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, June 6, 2002 and Hong Kong City University, November, 2003. (A report on my field work in Hebei province with two Chinese colleagues. In Chinese).

“Gods, Saints, Shamans and Processions: Comparing Local Religious Traditions from a Chinese Point of View,” public lecture, National Chengchi University, Taipei, Taiwan, June 14, 2002 (in Chinese) (AP) and Hong Kong City University, November, 2003. (published)

“Religion in China Today”, Western Washington University, Oct. 15, 2003, U.B.C. Oct. 24 and Nov. 3, 2003 and Hong Kong City University, November, 2003, University of Otago (New Zealand), Feb. 2004, and at the Headquarters of the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (C.I.A.) in May, 2004. I discussed this topic again at an orientation workshop for the Commissioners and staff of the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom that was held in Salt Lake City on June 24, 2005.

 

“Local Religion in North China: the Structure and Organization of Community Rituals and Beliefs”, lectures for the UBC China Studies Group on November 9, 2005 and at Columbia University in New York City on December 15, 2005. This lecture also presented at the Harvard University Fairbank Center on October 19, 2006, and at the Chinese University of Hong Kong on December 6, 2006.

“Chinese Religious Traditions from 1900-2005: an Overview”, presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Oriental Society, Western Branch, in Victoria, B.C. on October 14, 2006

 

“Chinese Religions: Current Situation and Future Prospects”, Workshop on “China Futures”, The Hudson Institute, Washington, D.C., June 11, 2008.

“The Eternal Venerable Mother (Wusheng laomu) in the Stone Tablet Inscriptions of Mt. Daze in Shandong Province”, Workshop on the Mt. Daze Inscriptions, Pingdu, Shandong, November, 2008. (This paper was presented for me by Wang Ch’iu-kuei because I was unable to attend. To be published in conference proceedings.)

 

Book and manuscript reviews, 2015 ff, for E.J. Brill and professional journals.