Graduate Courses

Research Areas

Note: Courses in Green are offered in 2018-2019 academic year.

Asia

ASIA 510B (012) –  Monastic Biography and Hagiography in East Asian Buddhism [3.0 credits]
Not offered in 2018-2019 academic year

As a general introduction to medieval East Asian (mainly Chinese and Japanese) monastic bio/hagiographical literature, this seminar (for graduate students and advanced under-graduates) will begin with a general discussion of its nature, structure and basic features, which is supplemented by a comparison of East Asian monastic biographies with Chinese secular (official) biographies on the one hand and Western (mainly Christian) biographies on the other. After a brief survey of biographies of nuns, a peculiar portion of East Asian monastic biographical literature, we will formally investigate the functions monastic biographies played in medieval East Asian Buddhism, focusing on the following aspects: (i) the writing of monastic biographies and the formation of sectarian consciousness, (ii) monastic biographies as a vehicle of sectarian ideologies, (iii) monastic biographies as a polemical instrument. In the course of this investigation, we will touch on the historical and textual value of monastic biographical literature, especially its significance for deciphering sectarian agenda. Some general methods of interpreting monastic biographies will also be introduced (in particular, we will stress the necessity and effectiveness of reading monastic biographies in close comparison with their corresponding autobiographies).

 

ASIA 524B (021)-Japanese for Chinese and Korean Specialists
Not offered in 2018-2019 academic year

This course is designed to make research produced in Japanese accessible to students who are specializing in topics related to China and Korea. Some Japanese reading capability is required but we will focus on improving existing skills and practicing strategies for unpacking Japanese scholarly writing.

We will begin by examining common patterns and stylistic tendencies within Japanese scholarly prose (the “shoronbun” 小論文 style). Since there are few set “rules” but many common attributes and frequently used phrases, we will parse some samples of this sometimes infuriating style. Our goal will be to read with maximum efficiency so that sections of interest can be quickly identified and understood.

We will then test article and book databases so that students can search and find secondary scholarship in their fields of study. We will use these selections to fuel the remainder of the class. By the end, students should have made their way through a number of Japanese articles or book sections that relate to their research areas.

Time and interest permitting, we will also discuss scholarly presentations (gakujutsu kenkyu happyo 学術研究発表) in Japan so that students can compile abstracts (yoyaku 要約) and various “materials” (shiryo 資料) in the form of handouts (rejume レジュメ) or simply understand how this process works in the context of Japanese presentations.

 

 

China

ASIA 502A (026) – Modern Chinese Fiction and Western Criticism [3.0 credits]
Instructor: Dr. Christopher Rea

Term 1, Wednesdays, 1:00-3:00pm, Buchanan D313

Course Description

What are the best ways to write cultural history? How is a researcher to identify what is important in cultures of the past, and to convey that importance in writing? How can we make our own writings on cultural history more persuasive, relevant, and accurate? How has modern Chinese cultural history been written, for good or for ill, during the past few decades? This course will examine theories, methods, and practices of writing cultural history, drawing examples from exemplary scholarship on cultures of the modern Sinophone world. Each week we will focus on a particular cultural practice or form, such as literature, translation, cinema, photography, music, publishing, and the graphic arts. Students will critique the merits of one book-length work of scholarship, and individually identify and evaluate one other study on a related topic. Along the way, students will learn practical research skills such as: conducting preliminary bibliographic searches; fast and slow reading; notetaking; formulating researchable questions; treating research as problem-solving; reconciling personal interests and the interests of the field; writing a book review; and proposing and writing a research paper. Reading knowledge of Chinese encouraged but not required.

Interested graduate students may email Dr. Rea at chris.rea@ubc.ca for a copy of the syllabus.

 

ASIA 570B (004) – Seeing Ghosts: Spectral Encounters in Chinese Popular, Literary and Visual Cultures [3.0 credits]
Instructor: Dr. Alison Bailey

Term 2, Thursdays, 3:00-6:00pm, Buchanan D214

This course will explore the figure of the Chinese ghost in a variety of representations across time, space and media.  Chinese philosophical and religious attitudes to the supernatural and the place of the (gendered) ghost in discourses of mourning, ritual, punishment, requital and order / disorder will be explored.  Classical tales of the strange, drama, poetry, and vernacular narratives will be discussed, along with their modern iterations of hauntings in fiction, news stories and film.  The ways in which the spectral is represented in visual media such as painting will be examined and encounters between the haunter, the haunted, and the ghost hunter analyzed as a particular form of seeing.

 

ASIA 511 (012) / ASIA 511 B (012) Buddhist and Taoist texts in Chinese; Reading and Research Methods
Instructor: Dr. Jinhua Chen

Date and Time: TBA

Topics of this course will be flexible, adjusting to the interest and background of the students. Selections for readings can be from any important Chinese Buddhist and Taoist texts belonging to any major Buddhist and Taoist traditions of any period. Focus is given to the doctrinal issues implied in a specific genre of Buddhist and Taoist texts. Methodological issues of interpreting Chinese Buddhist and Taoist texts are also to be discussed.

In addition to intensive reading of the original texts, students are to be trained in some basic methods indispensable for the research of Sinology in general and Buddhism and Taoism in particular. Students will be required to demonstrate at least basic competence in all the following areas:

  • Dictionaries (general and specialized).
  • Bibliographies and bibliographic databases in European and East Asian languages.
  • Historical Geography of China, Central Asia and India.
  • Use of maps, atlases and dictionaries.
  • Biography (religious and secular).
  • Official and religious titles.
  • Dates and chronologies.
  • Books and authors.
  • Structure and content of the Buddhist (and Taoist) canons.
  • Extra-canonical works and collectanea.
  • Indices and concordances (including electronic resources such as the Academia Sinica website).
  • Dunhuang materials.
  • Epigraphy.
  • Gazeteers (secular and monastic).
  • Dynastic histories.
  • Biji, anecdotal sources and unofficial histories.
  • Poetry.
  • Art historical sources.

By the end of this course students are expected to punctuate original Chinese Buddhist and Taoist texts correctly, translate them appropriately and interpret them both faithfully and creatively.

 

ASIA 506A (018) – Topics in Chinese Linguistics and Sociolinguistics [3.0 credits]
Not offered in 2018-2019 academic year

This course introduces graduate students to some fundamental aspects of the Chinese language – its history, structure, dialects, spoken vs. written language. We also examine sociolinguistic topics and issues related to language contact, language change, language ideology, language policy, and language use in Chinese society. The course will be conducted through lectures combined with class discussions of assigned readings and individual/small-group presentations. Course work will also include students’ selection of a research topic, their bibliographic search for relevant materials, a term paper and an oral presentation on the topic. The course is taught in English with examples from Chinese. Familiarity with the Chinese language is expected.

 

ASIA 507B (018) – Topics in Chinese Applied Linguistics [3.0 credits]
Not offered in 2018-2019 academic year

Pre-requisites ASIA 506: Chinese Linguistics and Sociolinguistics (or instructor’s approval)

This course provides an overview to theory and research related to teaching/learning Chinese as a second, foreign or heritage language. It explores current issues related to Chinese language instruction around the world and examines major approaches to foreign language pedagogy with an emphasis on their applications to Chinese language instruction. Topics include: Chinese second language acquisition and socialization, Chinese lesson planning, teaching methodology, Chinese teaching material development and evaluation, testing and assessment, Chinese heritage language learning, culture and language learning, and the use of technology in Chinese language teaching.

 

ASIA 508 (020) –  Topics in Pre-modern Chinese History and Institutions [3.0 credits]
Not offered in 2018-2019 academic year

This course examines in depth the history and institutions of imperial China with a focus on the Tang (618-907) and Song (960-1279) dynasties. Although background information will be covered, emphasis is on the character and patterns of social, political and intellectual history, and on the evolution of related institutions. Topics include: history and historiography, classical political thought, emperor and bureaucracy, structure of the central and local government, the examination system and civil service recruitment, female rule in early Tang politics, representation of womanhood, transformation of the ruling elite, land tenure and taxation, the rise of militarism, reform and counter reform, Confucian revival and the rise of Neo-Confucianism. Bibliography varies depending on student needs.

 

ASIA 510B ( 012) T2- Monastic Biography and Hagiography in East Asian Buddhism
Not offered in 2018-2019 academic year

As a general introduction to medieval East Asian (mainly Chinese and Japanese) monastic bio/hagiographical literature, this seminar (for graduate students and advanced under-graduates) will begin with a general discussion of its nature, structure and basic features, which is supplemented by a comparison of East Asian monastic biographies with Chinese secular (official) biographies on the one hand and Western (mainly Christian) biographies on the other. After a brief survey of biographies of nuns, a peculiar portion of East Asian monastic biographical literature, we will formally investigate the functions monastic biographies played in medieval East Asian Buddhism, focusing on the following aspects: (i) the writing of monastic biographies and the formation of sectarian consciousness, (ii) monastic biographies as a vehicle of sectarian ideologies, (iii) monastic biographies as a polemical instrument. In the course of this investigation, we will touch on the historical and textual value of monastic biographical literature, especially its significance for deciphering sectarian agenda. Some general methods of interpreting monastic biographies will also be introduced (in particular, we will stress the necessity and effectiveness of reading monastic biographies in close comparison with their corresponding autobiographies).

 

ASIA 512 B (005) – Advanced Readings in Classical Chinese [3.0 credits]                       
Not offered in 2018-2019 academic year

In this seminar we will read prose in Literary Chinese from the later imperial period (roughly 1000-1900 CE). “Literary Chinese” refers to the range of non-vernacular registers, based on older models, that were the normative form for most prestigious uses of writing: scholarship, bureaucratic documents, religious texts, even personal correspondence. The ability to write and/or read this language was shared among elites and some non-elites in China and the rest of East Asia, so it has left an enormous literary legacy: most of the surviving written material from China and Korea during this period, as well as a great deal from Japan and Vietnam.

The class is built around close reading of a small subset of this material in a few key genres; the exact content will be based on students’ interests and needs.

The only prerequisite is some experience reading Classical/Literary Chinese, whether in Chinese or another tradition (e.g., kambun). The class will be conducted in English, and no knowledge of Modern Chinese is required (students may read the texts with Korean, Japanese, or Vietnamese pronunciations, for example).

Anyone interested in taking this class should contact the instructor for further information.

 

Japan

ASIA 532B(009) – Readings in Classical Japanese Texts [3.0 credits]
Instructor: Dr. Joshua Mostow

Term 2, Date and time: TBD

Classical Japanese texts from a variety of genres and periods—chosen in consultation with the students—are read and translated. Base texts are often manuscripts or early modern editions, providing training in early modern palaeography.

 

ASIA 533A(006) – Topics in Modern Japanese Literature [3.0 credits]
Instructor: Dr. Christina Yi

Term 2, Mondays, 3:00pm-6:00pm, Buchanan D325

Explores the formation of literary discourses and practices in Japan from the 1880s to the 1920s through close reading and critical discussion of selected literary and critical texts, with particular attention to the translingual and cross-cultural formation of genres of writing (including the concept of “literature”), language, literary forms, and subjectivity in modern Japan.

 

ASIA 533A(011) – Topics in Modern Japanese Literature [3.0 credits]
Instructor: Dr. Sharalyn Orbaugh

Term 1, Mondays, 11:00am-1:00pm, Buchanan D312

Title: Allusion, Adaptation, Transmediation

Description:

In this seminar we will examine the ways modern Japanese narratives (fiction, manga, anime, film) have relied on prior texts (monogatari, myths, waka, Noh or Kabuki plays) from pre-modern Japan to tell their stories. We will discuss allusion and adaptation, considering how these techniques alter the act of reading. We will also explore transmediation of contemporaneous or nearly contemporaneous modern texts that exist in multiple media: manga, anime, film, prose. How is transmediation different from allusion or adaptation, and how does it affect the consuming experience (reading, viewing, listening)?

 

ASIA 570A (011)  – Popular Culture Theory [3.0 credits]
Instructor: Drs. Sharalyn Orbaugh and Bruce Fulton

Term 1, Wednesdays, 11:00am-1:00pm, Buchanan B312

This graduate level course explores theories and methods in the study of popular culture, with particular attention to popular culture phenomena originating in or moving through Asia.

Questions addressed in the course include:

-What do we mean by “popular” and what do we mean by “culture”? What is a “cultural product” and what is the “culture industry”? Who uses these terms and why?

-How is “popular” different from “mass,” and what is at stake in using these terms?

-How has the study of popular culture changed, from the days of the Frankfurt School to current fan studies, industry studies, or media studies?

-What is the relationship between industry, government, and content? (What drives content—consumer preferences? government support/regulation? industry profits and protocols?)

-How can we use theories and methodologies emerging from anglo-european contexts in the study of Asian popular culture? (And what do we mean by “Asian” popular culture?)

-Why are particular modes (e.g. parody, transmediation) or genres (romance, SF) typically considered popular rather than high culture?

The course will be divided into 3 thematic sections of about 4 weeks each:

  1. Theories of popular culture: the Frankfurt School (Benjamin, Adorno, Horkheimer, Habermas); De Certeau and theorists of everyday life; Constance Penley, Henry Jenkins, Matt Hills and other fan studies pioneers; theorists of popular culture in Asia and/or global popular culture (Appadurai, Dissanayake, Iwabuchi, Yong Dai Jin).
  2. Activities/media, modes, platforms, genres: popular activities/media (music, film, food, games, comics, literature; dance; oral performance); popular modes (adaptation, parody, transmediation, pastiche, fan creations); media platforms (digital vs. analog, video, TV, radio, books, social media, etc.); popular genres (SF, romance, horror, action, etc.).
  3. Case studies (the exact content of which will be determined by the interests of the class members). Some possibilities might be: bhangra, K-pop, Asia Extreme (cinema), kung fu/martial arts movies, fan fic, otaku culture, Komiketto, BL in China (or danmei), Bollywood.

All students will be expected to read the assigned materials (all of which are in English) for sections 1 and 2 of the course, and will use (and/or critique) the theories and methodologies from those readings to present a case study on a topic of their choosing in section 3 of the course.

 

ASIA 525A (007) – Topics in the Social History of Japanese Religions [3.0 credits]
Not offered in 2018-2019 academic year

 

ASIA 528A(019) – Problems of Japanese Intellectual History[3.0 credits]
Not offered in 2018-2019 academic year

This seminar’s goal is to challenge a number of long-standing assumptions regarding various aspects of Japanese society before the Meiji period. Major themes include the construction of individual and collective identity, aggressive pursuit of self-interest, defiant practice of forbidden religious traditions, interest in self-cultivation and personal betterment, understandings of happiness and well-being, embrace of “neglected” counter-ideological values as practiced, evidence of both individuality and equality, and resistance to modernity and the modern transformation.  The two primary texts are the co-edited (Nosco, Ketelaar and Kojima) Values, Identity and Equality in 18th– and 19th-Century Japan (Brill 2015); and (Nosco) Individuality in Early Modern Japan  (Routledge 2017).

 

ASIA 532A (021) –  Topics in Traditional Japanese Literature [3.0 credits]
Not offered in 2018-2019 academic year

This course will give students a broad yet in-depth view into premodern Japanese literary works from the Nara (710-784) to Edo (1603-1868) periods. The course is designed to be useful to those who are pursuing topics in premodern Japanese literature and history, are interested in improving or practicing reading classical Japanese texts, or would like to gain a better grasp of Japanese premodern literary history. We will examine and discuss a broad range of works while carrying out close reading of selections and relevant scholarship. Students will read a series of ancient to early modern literary sources aimed at preparing them for further studies, comprehensive examinations, and future teaching responsibilities.

 

Korea

ASIA 582A (008) – History and Structure of the Korean Language [3.0 credits]
Instructor: Dr. Ross King

Term 1, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:00-6:30pm, KORN 420

The purpose of the course is to learn the basics of Middle Korean, the language recorded in the earliest hangul records from the 15th century shortly after the alphabet was invented. The text we use is the 삼강행실도 (三綱行實圖, Illustrated Conduct of the Three Bonds).  This was an illustrated Neo-Confucian ethics primer that continued to be used and reprinted for the next 500 years in Choson and therefore offers many insights into historical changes in the Korean language.

 

ASIA 581  B (002) – Research Methods and Source Materials in Korean Studies [3.0 credits]
Not offered in 2018-2019 academic year

An introduction to primary and secondary sources in specific fields of Korean Studies as well as to the various methodologies used in the field. Students focusing on the Chosŏn dynasty are required to use materials in Classical Chinese. Students focusing on Korea in the 20th century are required to use materials in Korean and Japanese.

 

ASIA 581 A (007) – Research Methods and Source Materials in Korean Studies [3.0 credits]
Not offered in 2018-2019 academic year

 

ASIA 583A, B (001) – Topics in Korean Literature [3.0 credits]
Not offered in 2018-2019 academic year

This course is an intensive workshop seminar in Korean-to-English literary translation. Each student completes a translation of an as yet untranslated Korean short story, or a translation of any literary work that is treated in his or her MA thesis or Ph.D. dissertation. Students critique one another’s work, and are encouraged subsequently to seek publication of their complete translation.

 

ASIA 584B (008)  – Topics in Korean Traditional Literature [3.0 credits] 
Not offered in 2018-2019 academic year

We will spend the term reading from a couple different late-Choson manuscript copies of 서상기 (西廂記, aka Xixiangji in Mandarin). This is China’s most popular play, a love comedy (the inspiration for 춘향전, it would seem), and it was also hugely popular in Choson (though so scandalous as a text that it was never printed, and only ever circulated in manuscript). We will look at a couple different manuscripts and pay attention to the glosses and commentaries in Korean, as well as to the 18th- and 19th-century Korean translations that often accompanied in the margins. We would also read a few articles (one or two a week) in Korean about the reception of the play in Korea (not a lot of research has been done on this, though, because of Korean nationalist sentiment–after all, it’s not ‘Korean’).

 

ASIA 587A (002) – The History of the Choson Dynasty [3.0 credits]
Not offered in 2018-2019 academic year

A survey of Korea on the edge of modernity. We will start with an examination of the sirhak thinker Tasan Chŏng Yagyong (1762-1836), and then go on to look at changes in politics, religion, culture, and literature in Korea over the course of the 19th century before the major intrusions of the outside world in the last quarter of that century.  We will next look at how Korea dealt with the many challenges it faced after 1876 from a more assertive Japan, the West, and even China. The diaries of two Westerners in Korea at the end of the 19th century, Rev. Horace Underwood and Bishop Gustave Mutel, will be explored to see how Korea looked to outsiders at that time. Finally, we will look at how Koreans themselves reacted to the end of the five-century old Chosŏn dynasty.

 

ASIA 587 A (007) – The Choson Dynasty [3.0 credits]
Not offered in 2018-2019 academic year

This graduate seminar will deal with issues related to women, family life, status system, ethnocentrism, and foreign contacts in Late Choson and early Colonial Korea. Readings will include books and journal articles in Korea and English and each participant will be required to write a position paper (2-3 pages) for each meeting. Depending on the needs of participants, specific topics will be chosen and discussed.

 

South Asia

ASIA 576B (025) – Critical Issues in South Asian Studies [3.0 credits]
Instructor: Dr. Anne Murphy

Term 1, Fridays, 12:00-3:00pm, West Mall Swing Space 408

This class will address key questions and methods that have emerged in the study of South Asian Studies, across disciplines. We begin with post-colonial and subaltern studies, considering the ways the representation of South Asian cultures and pasts have been configured in the Western academy and in relation to nationalist projects in South Asia, as well as the ways in which “tradition” was configured within the colonial frame. This will lead us to consider alternative approaches to the study of pre-modern South Asia, to assess (for example) the nature of the Mughal state; caste; and cosmopolitan and vernacular linguistic and literary formations and the problem of translation. The class is meant to introduce graduate students (or possibly advanced undergraduates) to major themes and concerns in the study of South Asia in the post-colonial period.

 

ASIA 547 (023) – Narrative Theory and South Asian Literature [3.0 credits]
Not offered in 2018-2019 academic year

Key theoretical issues in the production and enactment of folk narratives in traditional and modern South Asian cultures.

 

Theories, Methods & Pan-Regional

ASIA 501A (017) –    Source Materials and Research Methods for Classical Chinese Studies [3.0 credits]
Instructor: Dr. Leo K. Shin

Term 1, Mondays, 3:00-6:00pm, Room: ASIA 604

The goal of this course is to introduce students to some of the research tools and source materials available for the study of China in the imperial period. Emphasis will be placed on the tools and sources that are particularly useful for the study of the history of later imperial China.

 

ASIA 521A (007) – Research Methods and Source Materials in Japanese Studies. [3.0 credits]
Instructor: Dr. Nam-Lin Hur

Term 1, Tuesdays, 3:00-5:30pm, Asian Center Room 604

During the semester we will read early modern Japanese documents in their original forms available from 『史料を読み解く3:近世の政治と外交』(東京:山川出版社, 2008). In each week we will closely read two original 「候文」文書 which are accompanied by 釈文, 読み下し and 現代語訳. The seminar is designed to train students in reading 「候文」documents for the study of early modern Japan.

 

ASIA 561A (008) – Problems of Modernization in Eastern and Southern Asia
Instructor: Dr.Ross King

Term 2, Tuesdays, 3:00pm – 6:00pm, , Buchanan D325

This course examines the relationship between colonialism and language, especially with respect to (mainly East) Asia. Topics covered include: orientalism, 19th-century philology, and the rise of modern linguistics; colonialism and missionary linguistics; colonialism and the rise of modern national languages in Asia; colonial educational and language policies and their legacies in Asia; the problem of cosmopolitan vs. vernacular in Asian colonial contexts; colonialism, linguistic thought and language ideology; elite bilingualism under conditions of colonialism; language contact and language change under colonialism; etc. Special attention is paid to British colonialism in India and Japanese colonialism in Korea and Taiwan.

Sample readings: L-J Calvet (1974/2002): Linguistique et colonialisme: petit traité de glottophagie; Cohn (1996): Colonialism and its forms of knowledge: The British in India; J. Errington (2008): Linguistics in a colonial world: a story of language, meaning, and power; J. Fabian (1986): Language and colonial power. The appropriation of Swahili in the former Belgian Congo, 1880-1938; W. Koyama (2003): Language and its double: a critical history of metalanguages in Japan (PhD dissertation, U Chicago).

NOTE: This seminar counts for the pan-Asian theory course requirement for Asian Studies PhD students.

 

ASIA 570A (019)  – Approaches to Asian Literature [3.0 credits]
Instructor: Dr. Peter Nosco

Term 1, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9:00am-11:00am, Neville Scarfe 1005

Approaches to Asian literature(s) examines works considered classics by and within the Islamic, Indian, Chinese and Japanese traditions.  The course is both text- and problem-centered, emphasizing the exploration of views and approaches alternative to those found within the European and North American traditions.  The principal goal for graduate students is pedagogical, i.e., to equip students in this class to train their own undergraduate students in any combination of Asian classics, and to do so in such a way that their students will feel challenged by these texts and problems.

NOTE: This seminar counts for the pan-Asian theory course requirement for Asian Studies PhD students.

 

ASIA 570A (025)  – Approaches to the Study of Asian Religions [3.0 credits]
Instructor: Dr. Anne Murphy

Term 1,  Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11:00am-12:30pm, Buchanan B219

Religious studies and Asian studies are, by nature, interdisciplinary fields. They are organized topically, exploring (respectively) what we call “religion” and the region we call “Asia.” Such interdisciplinary fields encompass and draw upon a variety of disciplinary approaches to the study of these subjects, to explore the intersections of the study of history(cultural and social history), society (anthropology and sociology), ideas (comparative philosophy and religion), and text (literature and critical studies).

This course will introduce students to the key issues in and approaches to the study of religion in Asia, with attention to a number of these disciplines. This class examines core questions in the study of religion—What is “religion”? How has this term been applied to Asian traditions?—to interrogate the Western genealogy and problematics of the idea of “religion,” its application to non-Western cultures and traditions, and issues that emerge in the study of Asian religions, in Asia and in Asian diasporas.

Graduate students in the class will engage in a common set of readings with advanced undergraduates, as well as a set of advanced related readings. They will be encouraged to complete research papers in keeping with their own research interests, with respect to the issues, ideas, and approaches covered in the class.

 

ASIA 580 (016) –    Modernization in Buddhist Clerical Education (Directed Reading) [3.0 credits]
Instructor: Dr. Jessica Main

Term 1, Directed Reading, Fridays, 3:00pm-6:00pm, C.K. Choi 129

This course will examine the case of Buddhism in Asia in light of theories of modernity with special attention to the instituions of clerical education and reforms of these institutions over the course of the modern era. Readings will include critical examination of educational modernization in different forms of Buddhism in Asia during the emergence of the nation-state. Educational modernization was not a simultaneous process across Asia, but depended on factors such as colonial interference, participation in global economies, urbanization, monastic economies, and patronage arrangements. It was also deeply affected by political ideology: colonialism, nationalism, postcolonialism, fascism, communism, secular democracy, and capitalism. State support or suppression of Buddhism is clearly seen in education broadly and clerical education specifically. Education, curricular materials, and new forms of publishing created new communities. Buddhist educators considered the problem of how to maintain the ideals of traditional education while providing useful knowledge to their monastic students.

NOTE: This seminar counts for the pan-Asian theory course requirement for Asian Studies PhD students.

 

ASIA 591 (010) – Critical Issues in Asian Studies [ 3.0 credits]
Instructor: Dr. Harjot Oberoi

Term 1, Wednesdays, 5:00pm-7:30pm, BUCH B312

Proseminar introducing major methodological and conceptual themes in the contemporary study of Asia, modern and pre-modern. Required of all Asian Studies PhD students, normally in their first year.

 

ASIA 592 (005) – The Profession of Asian Studies [ 3.0 credits]
Instructor: Dr. Bruce Rusk

Term 2, Wednesdays, 5:00pm-7:30pm, BUCH B216

Introduction to essential skills for academic and professional work in Asian Studies. Outlines career trajectories in the PhD and beyond, including grant applications, cv-writing, and job searches. Required of Asian Studies PhD students, normally in their first year.

 

ASIA 501 A,B (020) – Research Methods and Source Materials in Classical Chinese Studies [3.0 credits]
Not offered in 2018-2019 academic year

This course is an introduction to research methods and bibliography in Classical Chinese studies. While classroom discussion about research materials is necessary, students’ direct contact and familiarity with these materials are nonetheless the primary goal of this course. For this purpose, small problems related to specific types of material will be given to students regularly

 

 

ASIA 541A (025) –  Research Methods and Source Materials in South Asian Studies [3 credits]
Not offered in 2018-2019 academic year

This class represents a unique opportunity to read narrative poetic literature from early modern South Asia across several methodological and linguistic divides. We will examine Sufi (Islamic mystical) narrative traditions in Hindavi/Avadhi (generally known as early Hindi; in translation) and Punjabi (in the original), and focus on reading Waris Shah’s Heer in both Gurmukhi (the script utilized for Punjabi in India) and Shahmukhi (the Perso-Arabic script used for Urdu and Persian, which is utilized to write Punjabi in Pakistan). (Students must know one of these scripts to take the course.) To enable this reading “across scripts,” the first weeks of the class are dedicated to the teaching of one of these scripts to those who do not already know both of them. We will also examine new ground-breaking secondary work on this literary form that has been published in recent years.

 

ASIA 561 (011) –  Postcolonial Theory and Gender in Modern Asia  –  Postcolonial Feminism [3.0 credits]
Not offered in 2018-2019 academic year

NOTE: This seminar counts for the pan-Asian theory course requirement for Asian Studies PhD students.

Gender studies and postcolonial studies share a number of common concerns and approaches, but the rise of postcolonial studies in the last two decades has also brought challenges to some anglo-european feminist and gender theory. Similarly, gender studies has provided post-colonial theory and criticism with useful correctives through its tenet that gender/sex/sexuality must be a fundamental part of any cultural, social or political theory.

The seminar will first introduce students to key terms, debates and current issues in postcolonial studies with special attention to feminist and gender studies perspectives. Then we will examine examples of contemporary social issues in or about Asia that illustrate the commonalities and disjunctions of gender studies and postcolonial studies.

In the second half of the term we will return to the gendered roots of colonialism and orientalism and examine literary and artistic works that illustrate both the productive and dangerous aspects of representation.

 

ASIA 561 (002) – Problems of Modernization in Eastern and Southern Asia
Not offered in 2018-2019 academic year

Section 002 explores the reproduction of traumatic events from 20th century Asian history.  We will look at how such traumatic events as the violent suppression of peaceful demonstrators in Korea’s Kwangju in 1980,  the Korean  War, the Vietnam War, the bloody division of India into two separate countries in 1947, the bombing of Hiroshima, the killing fields of Cambodia, the horrors of Nanjing in 1937-38, and the Cultural Revolution in China from 1966 through 1976, and see how such events have been reproduced in journalistic and scholarly accounts as well as in film, drama,  art, and even music. A particular focus of this course will be to examine the role of real and constructed memories in self-identity, domestic politics, and international relations. The particular events to be studied are determined by the interests of the students enrolled.   This graduate seminar is appropriate for students of Asian history, politics, or culture as well as students in the School of Journalism and the MAPPS program.

The primary textbooks for this class are:
Margaret MacMillan:  The Uses and Abuses of History
Michael Berry:  A History of Pain: Trauma in Modern Chinese Literature and Film
There will be additional readings for each of the traumatic events we explore.

 

ASIA 561B (003) – Problems of Modernization in Eastern and Southern Asia
Not offered in 2018-2019 academic year

Dr. Hyung-Gu Lynn is offering the course “Popular Cultures in Asia: Theories, Methods, and Approaches.” This graduate seminar will cover various approaches to the analysis of popular culture in Asia.

It will be composed of three segments:

(1) theoretical and comparative readings;

(2) readings focused on specific cases in Asia (mainly in modern and contemporary periods covering South, Southeast, and East Asia); and

(3) readings and research for one final paper, for which there will be on presentation.

The format will be discussion based. Readings and schedules will be finalized at the January 11 session.

 

ASIA 562A (016)  – T1 2017W – Buddhism, Modernity, and the Nation-State in Asia
Not offered in 2018-2019 academic year

This course will meet on Friday afternoons. Critical examination of the case of Buddhism in Asia in light of the emergence of the nation-state and theories of modernity. Buddhist groups have thought carefully about the functions of modern states and their place within them in terms of military service, violence, enforcement, social service, relief, and medical care. Buddhists have lived for, under, and through every imaginable political ideology: colonialism, nationalism, postcolonialism, fascism, communism, secular democracy, and capitalism. Some have participated in mainstream power politics and the rise of Asian nationalisms. Others have formed activist and interest groups, becoming involved in nonviolent protest. Yet others have defined themselves as strictly apolitical. The seminar will analyze specific configurations of Buddand~ hism and the nation-state, and the idea that religion isor ought to beapolitical.