Dongchen Hou is a lecturer in Chinese language, literature, and film in the Department of Asian Studies at the University of British Columbia. She received her BA in Chinese linguistics from Xiamen University, M.A. in comparative literature from Beijing Normal University, and Ph.D. in East Asian Studies from the University of Arizona. Her teaching and research interests include literacy and writings; visual culture and media studies; affect and embodiment; digital humanities; human-machine interaction; translation studies; Chinese sociolinguistics; and Chinese literature, film, and criticism. Her primary research explores the interaction between human subjectivities and technological and media advancement happening in Chinese writing; she examines authorship (re)production, skill and labor, socio-political and historical desires, and power relations at work. She is currently working on two projects to examine different modalities of writing: one on Chinese stenography, and the other on calligraphy robots in contemporary China. In addition, she is also interested in the intersection of language and identity and has an upcoming co-authored article on Chinese immigrants’ language use in a mandarin church at the International Journal of Multilingualism. Due to her interdisciplinary background, she has worked with (and seeks future collaborative opportunities with) anthropologists, (art) historians, artists, literary critics, digital humanists, and engineers. Prior to joining the University of British Columbia, she has taught Chinese language and culture for five years at the University of Arizona.

 

Winter 2019

ASIA300 Writing and Culture in East Asia Sections

Practical, aesthetic, historical, technological and political issues pertaining to the use of Chinese characters - hanzi (Chinese), kanji (Japanese), or hanccha (Korean) - throughout the region.

Winter 2019

ASIA325 Hong Kong Cinema Sections

A survey of the cinema of Hong Kong from the post-war period to the present. The influence of Hong Kong on global cinema, and the forces (artists, studios, audiences, etc.) that have given rise to filmmaking styles and genres perceived as "distinctively Hong Kong."

Winter 2019

ASIA355 History of Chinese Cinema Sections

Introduction to the work of major directors.

Winter 2019

ASIA375 Global Chinese Cinemas Sections

A survey of Chinese cinemas in global perspective, covering films, filmmakers, producers, audiences, markets, industries, and critical discourse since the early twentieth century. Covers both cinematic culture and filmmaking technique.

Winter 2019

ASIA351 Modern Chinese Fiction in Translation Sections

Reading of selected novels and stories written between 1750 and the present.