Kay Duffy

Assistant Professor | Premodern Sinitic Poetry

Research Area

Education

Ph.D (East Asian Studies, September 2019), Princeton University
M.A. (Chinese Literature, May 2012), University of Colorado at Boulder

About

Kay Duffy is a scholar of premodern sinitic literatures whose research interests include the poetics, historiographies, and court cultures of the premodern sinographic sphere. Her current research project examines the composition and presentation of literary texts at court banquets held in observance of recurring seasonal festivals in order to explore the negotiation in poetry of the social and political instability of the early medieval period of disunion (roughly 200 CE to 600 CE). Her research has been supported by the Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships Program, the Fulbright U.S. Student Program, and the Center for the Study of Religion at Princeton University.


Kay Duffy

Assistant Professor | Premodern Sinitic Poetry

Ph.D (East Asian Studies, September 2019), Princeton University
M.A. (Chinese Literature, May 2012), University of Colorado at Boulder

Kay Duffy is a scholar of premodern sinitic literatures whose research interests include the poetics, historiographies, and court cultures of the premodern sinographic sphere. Her current research project examines the composition and presentation of literary texts at court banquets held in observance of recurring seasonal festivals in order to explore the negotiation in poetry of the social and political instability of the early medieval period of disunion (roughly 200 CE to 600 CE). Her research has been supported by the Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships Program, the Fulbright U.S. Student Program, and the Center for the Study of Religion at Princeton University.

Kay Duffy

Assistant Professor | Premodern Sinitic Poetry

Ph.D (East Asian Studies, September 2019), Princeton University
M.A. (Chinese Literature, May 2012), University of Colorado at Boulder

Kay Duffy is a scholar of premodern sinitic literatures whose research interests include the poetics, historiographies, and court cultures of the premodern sinographic sphere. Her current research project examines the composition and presentation of literary texts at court banquets held in observance of recurring seasonal festivals in order to explore the negotiation in poetry of the social and political instability of the early medieval period of disunion (roughly 200 CE to 600 CE). Her research has been supported by the Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships Program, the Fulbright U.S. Student Program, and the Center for the Study of Religion at Princeton University.