Minoru Takano

Sessional Lecturer | PhD Candidate

Research Area

About

Minoru Takano is a PhD candidate under the supervision of Dr. Bruce Rusk, studying the cultural history and literature of the Ming dynasty (1368-1644). Minoru was born in Gifu 岐阜, Japan, and went to Waseda 早稲田 University for his undergraduate studies (2008-2011) majoring in modern Japanese literature. He then recieved his MA degree on early Modern Japanese intellectual history of the Edo period (1603-1867) under the supervision of Dr. Peter Nosco also at UBC (2012-2014).

https://ubc.academia.edu/MinoruTakano


Research

I study the philological cultural history of the relationship between place and literati in the late imperial China by relying on concepts of identity of place and place-identity formed in the fields of phenomenological geography and environmental psychology. My dissertation focuses particularly on a Ming dynasty (1368-1644) figure, Li Dongyang 李東陽 (1447-1516), who was born and lived physically in Peking for almost entire life with deep attachment, but simultaneously defined himself confidently as a person of his ancestral hometown, Changsha 長沙/Chaling 茶陵. I am curious of the mechanism of his mentality in which physical and imagined places coexisted to form his self-identity. I also trace history through the Qing dynasty (1644-1611) to the Republic of China (1912-1949) that the later literati associated Li with particular locations, and argue that varied images of Li as a “person of X” depended on how a particular literatus defined certain places for the sake of his own place-identity. General works on the history of Beijing, local gazetteers, jottings, essays, and collections of poems and writings of myriad literati are my main sources for the study.


Minoru Takano

Sessional Lecturer | PhD Candidate

Minoru Takano is a PhD candidate under the supervision of Dr. Bruce Rusk, studying the cultural history and literature of the Ming dynasty (1368-1644). Minoru was born in Gifu 岐阜, Japan, and went to Waseda 早稲田 University for his undergraduate studies (2008-2011) majoring in modern Japanese literature. He then recieved his MA degree on early Modern Japanese intellectual history of the Edo period (1603-1867) under the supervision of Dr. Peter Nosco also at UBC (2012-2014).

https://ubc.academia.edu/MinoruTakano

I study the philological cultural history of the relationship between place and literati in the late imperial China by relying on concepts of identity of place and place-identity formed in the fields of phenomenological geography and environmental psychology. My dissertation focuses particularly on a Ming dynasty (1368-1644) figure, Li Dongyang 李東陽 (1447-1516), who was born and lived physically in Peking for almost entire life with deep attachment, but simultaneously defined himself confidently as a person of his ancestral hometown, Changsha 長沙/Chaling 茶陵. I am curious of the mechanism of his mentality in which physical and imagined places coexisted to form his self-identity. I also trace history through the Qing dynasty (1644-1611) to the Republic of China (1912-1949) that the later literati associated Li with particular locations, and argue that varied images of Li as a “person of X” depended on how a particular literatus defined certain places for the sake of his own place-identity. General works on the history of Beijing, local gazetteers, jottings, essays, and collections of poems and writings of myriad literati are my main sources for the study.

Minoru Takano

Sessional Lecturer | PhD Candidate

Minoru Takano is a PhD candidate under the supervision of Dr. Bruce Rusk, studying the cultural history and literature of the Ming dynasty (1368-1644). Minoru was born in Gifu 岐阜, Japan, and went to Waseda 早稲田 University for his undergraduate studies (2008-2011) majoring in modern Japanese literature. He then recieved his MA degree on early Modern Japanese intellectual history of the Edo period (1603-1867) under the supervision of Dr. Peter Nosco also at UBC (2012-2014).

https://ubc.academia.edu/MinoruTakano

I study the philological cultural history of the relationship between place and literati in the late imperial China by relying on concepts of identity of place and place-identity formed in the fields of phenomenological geography and environmental psychology. My dissertation focuses particularly on a Ming dynasty (1368-1644) figure, Li Dongyang 李東陽 (1447-1516), who was born and lived physically in Peking for almost entire life with deep attachment, but simultaneously defined himself confidently as a person of his ancestral hometown, Changsha 長沙/Chaling 茶陵. I am curious of the mechanism of his mentality in which physical and imagined places coexisted to form his self-identity. I also trace history through the Qing dynasty (1644-1611) to the Republic of China (1912-1949) that the later literati associated Li with particular locations, and argue that varied images of Li as a “person of X” depended on how a particular literatus defined certain places for the sake of his own place-identity. General works on the history of Beijing, local gazetteers, jottings, essays, and collections of poems and writings of myriad literati are my main sources for the study.